DVD Picks: March for Science

by Terri Robar and James Wargacki, Learning & Research Services

April 22 is best known as Earth Day, but it is also the day of the March for Science, an international movement led by organizers around the globe. The march’s organizers are people who value science and recognize how science serves everyone. Learn more here: www.marchforscience.com

These films were selected from our DVD collection to remind us that science can be useful, important, and fun.

The original PBS series where Carl Sagan taught everyone that science is interesting and understandable. Covering everything from the origins of life to the exploration of space, Sagan awakened a generation to the wonders of science.

After a bad storm blows across Mars, astronaut Mark Watney is presumed dead and left behind. Now stuck on a hostile planet, he must find a way to signal Earth and in the meantime survive on limited supplies. Join him as he follows his plan to “science the sh*t out of this.”

This film follows the treacherous voyage of five scientists who are reduced to microscopic size and injected into the bloodstream of an injured Czechoslovak scientist to remove a cerebral blood clot which must be repaired from inside the brain.

The untold story of the “human computers,” a team of female African-American mathematicians that helped launch John Glenn into orbit at the start of the space program in the United States.

Based on a true story of two parents, the Odones research and challenge doctors to develop a cure for their son, who suffers from a rare degenerative disease.

On a remote island, a wealthy entrepreneur secretly creates a theme park featuring living dinosaurs drawn from prehistoric DNA.

In the Antarctic, the quest begins to find the perfect mate and start a family. This courtship will begin with a long journey – a journey that will take them hundreds of miles across the continent by foot. They will endure freezing temperatures, icy winds and dangerous predators – all to find true love and raise their baby chicks safely.

Al Gore explains the facts of global warming, presents arguments that the dangers of global warning have reached the level of crisis, and addresses the efforts of certain interests to discredit the anti-global warming cause.

James Burke presents science as a detective story, illustrating the connections between events of the past and inventions of the future. Burke tracks through twelve thousand years of history for the clues that lead to eight great life-changing inventions. Like this one? We have two more in this series.

“Houston, we have a problem.” En route to the moon, an oxygen fuel-cell tank exploded, cutting electrical power and the astronauts’ air supply. The film shows the crew interacting with mission specialists back on earth to rig solutions as they retreat to the lunar module for a desperate return voyage to earth.

When Adams and his crew are sent to investigate the silence from a planet inhabited by scientists, they find all but two have died. Dr. Morbius and his daughter Altaira have somehow survived a hideous monster which roams the planet. Unknown to Adams, Morbius has made a discovery, and has no intention of sharing it (or his daughter!) with anyone.

A small Tennessee town gained national attention in 1925 when a biology schoolteacher was arrested for violating state law by teaching Darwin’s theory of evolution in the classroom. This film “is a slightly fictionalized account of the Scopes Monkey Trial, that galvanized legal dramas of the 1920s.”