Save the Date: Upcoming Events at UM Libraries


The University of Miami Libraries are hosting and co-presenting several events this fall and in the coming year. Please mark your calendars and join us for what promises to be a series of stimulating talks and presentations.

September 24, 2015 | Book Traces

9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. | Otto G. Richter Library
Join in the search for unique library books! The UM Libraries are hosting an event for readers and book enthusiasts in the community to help locate some of the many old books with original reader markings—from pencilled notes to hand drawn maps to sketches in the margins—that are housed at Richter Library. The customizations, known as marginalia, are the focus of a national library initiative started at the University of Virginia to preserve information about unique copies of library books in the wake of wide-scale digitization. In addition to hosting an exciting search for marginalia in UM Libraries collections with assistance provided by librarians, the event will feature the following presentations:

Book Traces and the Technology of Memory
Andrew Stauffer, Founder of Book Traces, University of Virginia
11:30 a.m., 3rd Floor Conference Room

A Delicate Balance: How Functionality, Artifactual Evidence, and Resource Allocation Affect Preservation Decision-making
Kara McClurken, Principal Investigator on the Book Traces grant, University of Virginia
4 p.m., 3rd Floor Conference Room


October 28, 2015 | MEET the Ghostly Treasures of Special Collections

7 p.m. | Special Collections, Otto G. Richter Library
Special Collections will highlight a series of spooky, mysterious, and otherworldly texts from its rare and distinctive collections for the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami’s October ICA MEETS event. As Halloween draws nigh, guests will learn about and explore rare books, manuscripts, photos, and ephemera culled from the thousands of historical books and documents related to spiritualism, the occult, and UFOs from the collections of Jackie Gleason and others. Special Collections is located on the 8th floor of the Otto G. Richter Library.

November 19, 2015 | Quince Sellos Cubanos Reception

6:30 p.m. | Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion, Otto G. Richter Library
Join us for a reception and conversation with artist María Martínez-Cañas highlighting her exhibition, a portfolio of 15 gelatin silver prints now on view at the library along with the original Cuban stamps that inspired her work. Exploring themes of history, memory, and identity, the limited-edition series was donated to the Cuban Heritage Collection by Alan Gordich in 2014. The exhibition will remain on view through December 2015.

January 14, 2016 | Arva Moore Parks Presents George Merrick, Son of the South Wind

6:30 p.m. | Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion, Otto G. Richter Library
As UM kicks off the 90th anniversary celebrations in 2016, Miami historian and University trustee Arva Moore Parks will present her latest book on Coral Gables’ founder and UM visionary George Merrick. Parks’ presentation at the library, co-sponsored by Books & Books, is in conjunction with the official opening of The Pan American University: The Original Spirit of the U Lives On, an exhibition of historical materials from the Libraries’ unique and distinctive collections reflecting the University’s enduring connection to Latin America and the Caribbean.


Featured events are free and open to the public. For more information or to RSVP, please contact or call 305-284-4026.

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Now Available at UM: Mendeley Institutional Edition

mendeleyTraining_600x600Attend the Training Session on 9/22

A highly acclaimed reference management application that allows researchers to organize documents, collaborate with others online, and discover the latest research trends and statistics is now available to all UM students, faculty, and staff. The University of Miami recently subscribed to Mendeley Institutional Edition, an institutional version of Mendeley with premium user features and additional institutional support.

To celebrate the purchase of this new product, UM and Elsevier, Mendeley’s parent company, are presenting a training session for UM researchers and all students or employees that would like to learn more about using the Mendeley Institutional Edition and how it can support their research.

Tuesday, September 22
3:30 – 5 p.m.
Information Literacy Lab, Richter Library, 3rd floor

An Amazon Kindle Fire HD will be raffled off at the end of the training session.

Mendeley is cross-platform and supported by all major browsers. With more than three million users, the program is know for

  • driving researcher productivity by helping users manage, read, share, annotate and cite papers and projects.
  • enabling collaboration and knowledge sharing by hosting a network for users to connect with like-minded researchers and discover research trends and statistics.
  • providing a crowdsourced database with a unique layer of social research information and Open API, leading to additional insights, and is useful for app-building.


You can now join the official UM Mendeley group on the Mendeley website and gain the benefits of our institutional membership.

Learn more about Mendeley by attending the training session. Register now by contacting William Jacobs at

Visioning Studio for the Future Learning Commons Opens at Richter Library

The Visioning Studio for the future Learning Commons is now open on the first floor of Richter Library.  Look for the large open space with the orange stripes brightening your path. The Visioning Studio offers a place for the UM community to begin trying out different types of spaces, services, and technologies that the UM Libraries might offer in partnership with campus academic service units. Here is a sampling of what you’ll discover in the Visioning Studio this month:

  • Free tutoring provided by the Academic Resource Center begins in the Visioning Studio’s Consultation Hub on September 8 at 5 p.m. The service will be provided Monday – Thursday evenings from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. The sound in the Visioning Studio will increase accordingly to a collaborative, conversational level during these times.  When tutoring is not occurring, the Consultation Hub is available for open study.


  • Brightspot consultants will be leading user experience interviews and workshops with students and faculty in the Active-Learning Environment during the week of September 8. The goal of this research is to involve our students and faculty in the design of our future Learning Commons. We are grateful to all who are participating!


  • Check out the puzzle station in our prototype BrainSpa, where you can relax and reboot your mind. We are hoping to hear your ideas about other activities you might like to be able to do in the Learning Commons.

Share your vision with us!


Join Us for Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Libraries‌


UM College of Arts & Sciences Center for the Humanities Presents
Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Libraries‌
Friday, September 25, 2015
12:30 p.m.

M. Christine Schwartz Center for Nursing Education
Executive Board Room
5030 Brunson Drive | Coral Gables, FL 33146

For UM Faculty and Graduate Students
Register now

Engage in conversation about career opportunities in 21st-century libraries and cultural institutions with a distinguished panel of University of Miami Libraries administrators and postdoctoral fellows, whose research interests include the humanities, social sciences, and sciences.  Listen to their stories, learn about library and archives career exploration strategies including fellowship opportunities, and ask them your questions at this interactive session.


About the Speakers

Charles Eckman, Dean of Libraries, Otto G. Richter Library, University of Miami
Dr. Eckman previously served as university librarian and dean of library services at Simon Fraser University (2010-13), director of collections at the University of California, Berkeley (2006-10), and principal government documents librarian and head of the social sciences resource group at Stanford University (1997-2006).

Dr. Eckman has managed and consulted for several digital library initiatives.  He has served on the board of directors for the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries, Canadian Association of Research Libraries, and Canadian Research Knowledge Network; he also served on the Depository Library Council to the Public Printer. Dr. Eckman’s research interests include information policy, open access initiatives, digital scholarship, and the evolution of scholarly communication. He holds an MLIS from UC Berkeley, a PhD and MA in Politics from Princeton University, and a BA in Political Science from Indiana University.

Kelly Miller, Associate Dean, Learning & Research Services, University of Miami
Dr. Miller earned a PhD in Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Michigan and held a Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Virginia. Prior to joining the UML, she worked at UCLA Library.

Timothy Norris, CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Miami
Tim Norris is a second-year Council of Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation at the University of Miami Libraries. He earned a PhD in Environmental Studies (a.k.a. Geography) at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC). Prior to his doctoral work at UCSC he started and maintained a small development NGO in Peru.

Martin Tsang, CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Miami
Martin Tsang serves as a liaison librarian for faculty and students in History and Area Studies. Martin is working to develop print and digital collections, provide consultative and instructional research support services, and assist the Libraries in designing a new model for transformative library engagement with our research and teaching communities. Martin is an anthropologist and received his PhD at Florida International University. He was awarded fellowships at the Cuban Heritage Collection for his doctoral dissertation that focuses on the Chinese Cubans. Prior to his position at UML, Martin was a postdoctoral research fellow on a National Institutes of Health-funded project investigating HIV, drug use, and the tourist industry in the Dominican Republic using a “syndemics” framework.

UM Libraries to Host Hunt for “Hidden Treasures” in Richter Library Stacks

UML Book Tracesby Sarah Block, Library Communications

UM Special Collections Librarian Jay Sylvestre believes that every book, as a record of stories from the past, is unique. The old, seemingly forgotten texts he unearthed in a recent search of the Richter Library Stack Tower are markedly one-of-a-kind, adorned with notes, illustrations, and even physical objects belonging to readers past. Now piled on his desk on the 8th floor, the stack of books, some that are long out of print, will soon come to light again. Their unique markings, known as marginalia, are the target of Book Traces, a nationwide crowdsourcing project started at the University of Virginia (UVA) soon touching down in Miami.

The project aims to preserve information about unique copies of library books, providing a website in which libraries and their users nationwide can upload examples of marginalia ranging from penciled notes about the work to hand drawn maps and sketches inspired by the text. One of Sylvestre’s findings from Richter Library, Jack London’s Tales of the Fish Patrol, contains the symmetrical stain of pressed flowers between two pages. “It’s a little bit like a treasure hunt,” he says. “Because you find these traces of the past and suddenly it’s not just a book you’re looking at, but a window into someone else’s life from another time period. It’s fascinating.”

Now hoping to foster public engagement on these unique library books, Sylvestre is organizing UM Libraries’ first annual Book Traces event on September 24, inviting all book enthusiasts in the community to explore and discover unique books in the stacks and share them on the Book Traces website. A number of groups from UM’s College of Arts and Sciences, including English, classics, and musicology classes, are participating in the event, and Sylvestre hopes to attract the participation of individual students, faculty, and community members joining in the hunt as well, as he’s confident that many more exciting discoveries lie ahead.

“There are many books that were donated during the early years of the University with very distinctive marginalia left by their original owners,” he says. Although books from before 1800 have likely been moved into the Special Collections department, where Sylvestre works, there are many distinctive books—with unique marginalia—from the past two centuries that are still in circulation in the library’s general collections and housed in the Stack Tower, he explains.


Marginalia in the form of a photograph captured for the Book Traces website in 2014. The photo was found in a copy of the nineteenth-century journal The Spirit Messenger, housed at Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Book Traces focuses chiefly on books from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that are little used because of their age, and yet not distinctive enough at this point to be housed in special collections. “With many books from this time period being made available in a digital format, people are engaging less with the very interesting copies that exist on library shelves,” Sylvestre says. The Book Traces stated mission is to engage the question of the future of the print record in the wake of wide-scale digitization.

Sylvestre explains the project is also about preserving the history of reading, and readers. He comments, “Books are tools, so the way people used books one hundred years ago gives us insight into the life they led during that historical period. The books have anthropological value.”

The Libraries welcomes readers and book enthusiasts throughout the community to join in the search for unique books at Richter Library by participating in its first annual Book Traces event, which will take place September 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Participants can come at any point throughout the day to explore the stacks floors for marginalia, and will be provided with instruction and assistance by UM Librarians as well as the opportunity to submit their discoveries to the Book Traces database.

The event will also include a presentation by the project’s founder, Andrew Stauffer, director of NINES at UVA, on digitization and the future of nineteenth-century print, at 11:30 a.m. in Richter Library’s 3rd Floor Conference Room. Kara McClurken, director of preservation services at UVA and a principal investigator on the grant that funds Book Traces, will close the event at 4 p.m. in the 3rd Floor Conference Room with a presentation on libraries and print preservation decision-making, discussing the delicate balance of functionality, artifactual evidence, and resource allocation.

Additional information on the Book Traces mission and examples of marginalia can be found on the Book Traces website. More on the UM Libraries Book Traces event will be available in the coming weeks on the Libraries’ homepage. This event is free and open to the public.

RSVP by September 17 to or 305-284-4026.


The historic pastime of pressing flowers comes to light in a copy of Gray’s School And Field Book of Botany (1870) at Mount Holyoke College Library containing leaves pressed between its pages. The marginalia was posted to Book Traces in 2014.

Join Us for Broadcasting Modernity: Cuban Commercial Television, 1950-1960 on September 9


The University of Miami’s Cuban Heritage Collection
and Florida International University’s Cuban Research Institute
invite you to a presentation of the book

Broadcasting Modernity: Cuban Commercial Television, 1950-1960
by Yeidy M. Rivero, PhD

Opening remarks by Jorge Duany, PhD
Director, FIU Cuban Research Institute

Wednesday, September 9, 2015
Reception 6:30 p.m.
Presentation 7 p.m.

Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion
Otto G. Richter Library, 2nd Floor
University of Miami
1300 Memorial Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33146

RSVP to or call 305-284-4026.
Reception sponsored by the Amigos of the Cuban Heritage Collection


The birth and development of commercial television in Cuba in the 1950s occurred alongside political and social turmoil. In this period of dramatic swings encompassing democracy, a coup, a dictatorship, and a revolution, television functioned as a beacon and promoter of Cuba’s identity as a modern nation. In Broadcasting Modernity, television historian Yeidy M. Rivero shows how the television industry enabled different institutions to convey an image of progress, democracy, economic abundance, high culture, education, morality, and decency. After nationalizing Cuban television, the state used it to advance Fidel Castro’s project of creating a modern socialist country. As Cuba changed, television changed with it. Dr. Rivero not only demonstrates television’s importance to Cuban cultural identity formation; she explains how the medium functions in society during times of radical political and social transformation.

Yeidy M. Rivero is Professor of Screen Arts and Cultures at the University of Michigan. She is the coeditor of Contemporary Latina/o Media: Rethinking Production, Circulation, and Politics (2014) and author of Tuning Out Blackness: Race and Nation in the History of Puerto Rican Television (2005). Her scholarship focuses on television studies, race and the media, global media, and Latino/a studies.

Please click map image below to enlarge. Contact us at 305-284-4026 or with questions about directions and parking.


CHC Research Colloquia August Schedule

The Cuban Heritage Collection’s 2015-2016 Research Colloquia continues in August with several talks by researchers on works in progress. ​Colloquia are scheduled for 3 p.m. unless otherwise noted.

    • Thursday, August 13
      Abel Sierra Madero, New York University (visiting fellow)
      Made in Cuba: Theatre, Nation and the Forging of the Erotic Subject in the Second Republic (1933-1958)
    • Tuesday, August 18
      Elise Arnold-Levene, Columbia University (CHC Graduate Fellow)
      Lydia Cabrera, the Storyteller as Collector
    • Thursday, August 20 * rescheduled for Wednesday, September 2
      José Villar, Florida International University (CHC Graduate Fellow)
      New Men, New Nations, New Selves: Queer Subjects between Assimilation and Practices of Freedom in Contemporary Cuban Cultural Production
    • Tuesday, August 25
      William Kelly, Rutgers University (CHC Graduate Fellow)
      Constancy and Change: An Analysis of Revolutionary-Era Urban Housing Policy in Cuba
    • Thursday, August 27
      Richard Mwakasege-Minaya, University of Michigan (CHC Graduate Fellow)
      Mobilizing the Empire: Cuban Exile Media & Cold War Politics
    • Monday, August 31
      Francisca Aguilo Mora, University of Miami (CHC Graduate Fellow)
      Language Crossing and Multiaccentuality in Women Writers del Gran Caribe: Narrative, Drama and Performance
  • Learn more about the CHC Graduate Fellowships »

2015-2016 CHC Research Colloquia Convenes

As we welcome a new class of graduate fellows to the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion, we open the 2015-2016 CHC Research Colloquia. Join us as fellows and other researchers discuss their work and their research in the Cuban Heritage Collection. Colloquia are open to the public and scheduled for 3 p.m. unless otherwise noted. RSVP to 305-284-4900 or

Thursday, June 25
Rebecca Salois, CUNY (CHC Graduate Fellow)
“Choteo Cubano: Humor as a Critical Tool in 20th Century Cuban Theater”

Tuesday, June 30
Sara Kozameh, New York University (CHC Graduate Fellow)
“The Agrarian Reforms in Revolutionary Cuba: 1959-1965”

Thursday, July 9
Daniel Fernandez, University of Florida (CHC Graduate Fellow)
“Transnational Contributions to Cuban State Formation: the Spanish Republican Exiles in Cuba”

Thursday, July 23
Olivia Ortega, Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología, Mexico (visiting researcher)
Influencia de los Estados Unidos en la construcción de la identidad colectiva publicitaria de México y Cuba, 1930-1950
In Spanish

Tuesday, July 28
Antonio Cardentey Levin, University of Florida (CHC Graduate Fellow)
“Crítica de la pasión caribeña: La dialéctica de los afectos en la novela histórica del Caribe insular hispano”

Tuesday, August 18
Francisca Aguilo Mora, University of Miami (CHC Graduate Fellow)
“Language Crossing and Multiaccentuality in Women Writers del Gran Caribe: Narrative, Drama and Performance”

Thursday, August 20
José Villar, Florida International University (CHC Graduate Fellow)
“New Men, New Nations, New Selves: Queer Subjects between Assimilation and Practices of Freedom in Contemporary Cuban Cultural Production”

Tuesday, August 25
William Kelly, Rutgers University (CHC Graduate Fellow)
“Constancy and Change: An Analysis of Revolutionary-Era Urban Housing Policy in Cuba”

Thursday, August 27
Richard Mwakasege-Miyar, University of Michigan (CHC Graduate Fellow)
“Disseminating Greater Cuba: Cuban Exiles & Cuban-American Media Production”

Cuban Sculptor Roberto Estopiñán (1921-2015) Honored at CHC

by Sarah Block, Library Communications

Click the image above to watch a video of the discussion on May 13. More photos from the event can be viewed on Facebook.

Click the image above to watch a video of the discussion on May 13. More photos from the event can be viewed on Facebook.

Friends, family, and longtime admirers of Cuban sculptor Roberto Estopiñán shed light on the late artist’s vision and the compassion behind his celebrated work during an event held in his memory at the Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) and co-presented with the Cuban Museum on May 28. Estopiñán, who died in Miami in January 2015 at age 93, is widely known for his work in sculpture describing the complexities of the human condition, often through interpretations of the female form.

The program included a recognition of Estopiñán’s widow, Carmina Benguría, followed by remarks by nephew George Roberto Pace and art historian Alejandro Anreus on Estopiñán’s work and social activism—often interrelated—prior to his exile in 1961 and throughout his life. “At the heart of his work was always the human figure for he believed in the integral and spiritual value of the human person,” Anreus said. The program also included readings by the poets Alina Galliano and Gastón Álvaro, and a screening of the 1994 documentary Artists in Exile: Roberto Estopiñán by the late Cuban-American television writer and producer Ray Blanco.

Forty-six of Estopiñán’s sketchbooks, a few which were on display during the event, were donated to CHC where they will now be preserved and made available to the public.

Photos by Andrew Innerarity.


Carmina Benguría, widow of Roberto Estopiñán, is honored by CHC Chair Maria Estorino Dooling (left), Ileana Fuentes of the Cuban Museum, and Benguría’s great-nephew Griffin Pace, during the May 28 celebration of Estopiñán’s life and work.

Join Us for an Artist Talk on Creating a Literary Map of Los Angeles


How might one depict the literary history of a city as complex and diverse as Los Angeles? In 2011, artist J. Michael Walker tackled this question, creating a “City in Mind: A Lyrical Map of the City of Los Angeles” (color pencil on polypropylene paper, 50″ high x 256” wide), a monumental illustrated literary map of Los Angeles. First exhibited at the Hammer Museum, the map was later acquired by the UCLA Library, where it will soon be placed on permanent display. The remarkably generative work — now fully digitized — has been integrated into history, literature, and digital humanities courses at UCLA and led to new opportunities for teaching with special collections in the digital era.

In conversation with Kelly Miller, Associate Dean of Learning and Research Services at the University of Miami Libraries, J. Michael Walker will discuss the work, how it came to be, and the collaborations it has inspired.

The conversation will be followed by Q&A. This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP now to or call 305-284-4026.

About the Artist
Photo-by-Michael-Dooley_crop2J. Michael Walker’s multicultural works connect history and spirituality with an empathic feminism. His artwork has been exhibited both nationally and internationally, including solo exhibitions at the Harvard Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Mexico City’s Museo Nacional de Culturas Populares, and the Autry Center Museum of the American West. His first book, All the Saints of the City of the Angels (Heyday, 2008), which he both wrote and illustrated, as an exploration of the history and multicultural heritage of Los Angeles, won Art Book of the Year and Best Regional Non-Fiction on the Pacific West for 2009, and is in its second printing. J. Michael’s essays have been published in the Los Angeles Times, on the Zocalo website, and in Iris, the online magazine of the Getty Museum.