Pop Culture Series: 75 Years of Wonder Woman

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By Lauren Fralinger, Lauren and Research Services

They’re often called the “trinity” in comic book circles: Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman. Over the past 75 years, we have seen Superman and Batman on screen in many incarnations, each portrayal adding a bit more history to the character. 2016 has brought us only our second live portrayal of Wonder Woman, and though audiences haven’t seen her as frequently, that is about to change. Celebrating her 75th anniversary in 2016, Wonder Woman is a feminist pop culture icon whose legacy has endured nearly a century.

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Wonder Woman appears on the first issue of Sensation Comics (1942). Art by H. G. Peter.

Debuting in 1941 in All Star Comics #8, Wonder Woman was one of the earliest female superheroes to make it into print. Developed by William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman was created to be a different kind of superhero. Still in their early days, superhero comics were dominated by powerful, almost exclusively male heroes who used physical strength or technology to win their battles. In contrast, Marston wanted to create a superhero who won not through the strength of their fists, but also through love. It was Marston’s wife Elizabeth who suggested that this new superhero be a woman.

Wonder Woman’s origins are steeped in Greek mythology. Born as Diana, Princess of the Amazons, she was sculpted from clay by her mother, Queen Hippolyta and imbued with powers from several Olympian goddesses. Withdrawn from the world and protected by the gods, the Amazons lived in isolation on a hidden island until it was accidentally discovered by an American intelligence officer whose plane crashed there during World War II. Selected to bring the man back to “Man’s World” and to join the fight against the Nazis, Diana was gifted a pair of magical, bulletproof bracelets and a lasso of truth, which forces honesty from anyone it captures. Wonder Woman quickly joined the war alongside other early superheroes and served on the Justice Society of America, one of the first superhero teams.

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Lynda Carter (left) first portrayed Wonder Woman on screen in the 1970s. Gal Godot (right) will take on the role in the 2017 series.

Over the course of 75 years, Wonder Woman has gone through dozens of incarnations in the comics as writers and stories have come and gone. Acknowledged early on as one of the most powerful heroes in the DC Comics stable, Wonder Woman went through a strange period in the late sixties and early seventies where her powers were taken from her entirely. Dismayed that one of the most recognizable and powerful women in pop culture was no longer able to compete on the same field as her super powered male counterparts, Gloria Steinem placed Wonder Woman on the cover of the inaugural issue of her new magazine, Ms., and criticized the decision to strip away everything that made Diana so empowered. A year later, Wonder Woman had her bracelets, lasso and superpowers returned, and was back in full fighting form.

Diana’s first on-screen portrayal was made by Lynda Carter in the 1970s Wonder Woman television series. Airing from 1975 to 1979 during the peak of the second-wave feminist movement, Wonder Woman presented a powerful, intelligent, and deeply human woman capable of extraordinary abilities to American audiences. Decades after the end of the 1970s series, Wonder Woman made appearances in various animated series such as Justice League and Justice League Unlimited in the early 2000s, but was not portrayed live again until 2016’s Batman vs. Superman. Though Batman and Superman both made the jump to the movies decades earlier, Gal Gadot’s portrayal of the Amazon princess was the first time Wonder Woman had made it into theaters. Batman vs. Superman may have been her first silver screen appearance, but it won’t be her last; Gadot will reprise her role as Diana for 2017’s Wonder Woman.

Interested in more Wonder Woman? The Richter Library has you covered. Check out more books and comics about the adventures of the Amazon Princess here:

Books:

Wonder Woman: A Celebration of 75 Years (2016)

Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine (2014)

Wonder Woman (2012)

Wonder Woman ‘77 (2016)

Sensation Comics Featuring Wonder Woman (2015)

Wonder Woman: The Greatest Stories Ever Told (2006)

Wonder Woman: Earth One (2016)

 

DVDs:

Wonder Woman: The Complete First Season (2004)

Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines (2012)

 



Camner Family Donates Rare Musical Treasures

University of Miami Trustee Alfred Camner, his wife, Anne Camner, and their four children, all of whom are UM alumni, have made a donation to the University of rare and valuable scores composed by musical giants—from Beethoven to Gershwin—that were printed and bound during the composers’ lives.

Alfred, J.D. ’69, and Anne, J.D. ’72, along with children Danielle Camner Lindholm J.D. ’95, Errin Camner L.L.M. ’99, Lauren Camner Winter M.B.A. ’98, and Andrew Camner B.A. ’09, donated several hundred scores, collectively forming the Camner Family Music Collection, to the Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library and Technology Center at the Frost School of Music, where it will be available to UM students, researchers, and the public.

“It is our family’s desire that this collection of first and early printed music editions form the true start to creating an extraordinary musicological resource, unmatched by modern editions,” said Alfred Camner, who, with his wife, also endowed UM’s Camner Center for Academic Resources.

The collection features historical works spanning three centuries and with origins in many parts of the world. Collection materials include rare lithography-printed and leather-bound editions of Christoph Willibald Gluck’s Alceste (1767), Georges Bizet’s Carmen (1875), and Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring (1913), among many others published between the 18th and 20th centuries.

Shelton Berg, dean of the Frost School, calls the gift a “transformative” resource for members of the Frost School and beyond. “When we look at a recently published score of a musical work from 100 years ago or more, we are seeing the music as something ‘from the past,’” Berg says. “Conversely, when a student performer or researcher examines an original edition score, with the marginal notations, the music is suddenly ‘in the present.’ They are experiencing it in the time of its creation. It’s hard to describe the exhilaration that produces.”

The Camner Collection arrives as the University is preparing to carry out new initiatives supporting educational innovation and encouraging new pedagogical approaches in the classroom. Frank Cooper, research professor emeritus at the Frost School, says this timing is important. “In an age where electronic media have taken over, there are no research materials to compare to original objects, in this case, printed scores from the times of the composers themselves. How invaluable for researchers today and for many generations to come.”

In details such as marginal notations, Camner says, the collection reveals how scores were studied and used in practice, in concerts, and in opera houses through time. Additionally, notes may point to how the music has evolved. “There is no substitute for the feeling a scholar or music student gets from handling a score that might have been used by Beethoven or Verdi or Puccini or Stravinsky, scores published in their lifetimes, edited by them, and often later corrected or changed,” Camner says. “These first and early editions are the closest we get to a sense of the time and place and world of the composer, a time when the composers often depended on the sales of these scores for their livelihoods.”

Nancy Zavac, who heads the Weeks Music Library, says that the Camner Collection brings a new level of research prestige to the library, which houses a wide range of musicology resources, including modern books, journals, and recordings, as well as unique and distinctive materials. “All music librarians are eager to have treasures in their collections. The Camner Collection is such a thing. It is exciting for me and my staff to care for, and greatly enhances our holdings.”

Dean of Libraries Charles Eckman expressed deep gratitude to the Camner Family for donating this important collection. “Miami is notable for the presence of several individual collectors of rare and unique cultural and bibliographic treasures,” he said. “The Camner Family is to be commended for their appreciation of the scholarly and teaching value of this private collection, and we celebrate their generosity of spirit in enabling the exposure and application this collection will have at the University of Miami for current and future generations of researchers and students.”



New Exhibit Explores Gender and Social Justice in Vintage Board Games

By Yvette Yurubi, Reference Assistant, Special Collections

Long before video games came along, board games dominated as a common pastime for adults and kids. With their 2-D platforms, simple narratives, and easy, straightforward objectives, they were a hit among friends, during parties and family gatherings. So what can we learn today from this historic national pastime?

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What Shall I Be? The Exciting Game of Career Girls (1966), players vie to be first in becoming a “career girl.”

After Special Collections recently acquired a series of vintage board games, UGrow Fellow Ellen Davies created a display highlighting what games can tell us about social issues and attitudes in mainstream culture. Without the many bells and whistles virtually transporting players to worlds beyond, these games used more simple tactics to entertain, meanwhile reflecting the ideals of the time. In games from the 1960s and 1970s, we are transported to a time when even the concept of equality, regardless of gender or race, was still making its way into many parts of society.

What Shall I Be? The Exciting Game of Career Girls, for instance, is a game where players must roll the dice, move around the board, and collect career, personality, and subject cards in order to obtain their “dream job.” The game only offers to women six very limiting jobs to choose from: model, airline hostess, ballet dancer, actress, teacher, and nurse. Notably absent are many STEM-based jobs aside from nursing, jobs in the military, and hard-labor jobs, and the game comes equipped with set-backs where a modeling career is out of a player’s reach due to them being overweight or being unattractive. It presents a singular view in which women are highly valued for their looks and behavior rather than their education, intellect, and abilities.

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Male career options highlighted in What Shall I Be? The Exciting Career Game for Boys.

It’s notable that the boy’s version of the game does also offer careers that would be considered traditional for men alongside an array of educational possibilities: law school – statesman; graduate school – scientist; college – athlete; medical school – doctor; technical school – engineer; and flight school – astronaut. However, the absence of careers like steward, model, or dancer also shows a limited perception where men aren’t granted much freedom to pursue anything that doesn’t fall within long-stemming societal views of masculinity.

While these games might be taken at face value, it’s also possible that the creators wanted to use them to make social commentary by highlighting the blatant lack of equality. Woman & Man: The Classic Confrontation furthers this idea by encouraging players to take on the role of the opposite gender and experience “life” through their lenses. The goal of the game is to gather 100 status quo points, though those who choose to play as women can only start with a range of 5-40 points and a position as an assistant while those who play as men, start the game with 36-60 points and a managerial position. The lack of gender equality is exhibited from the onset, illustrating the harder struggle women have had to endure to even stand on an even playing field with men.

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Woman & Man: The Classic Confrontation (1970s) encourages players to experience life through the lens of the opposite sex.

In the wake of growing awareness of social issues and the expanding and rapidly evolving concepts of gender and sexuality, these games seem laughably outdated and politically incorrect. However, aside from their novelty, they do provide an opportunity to open up a dialogue about how casual sexism and restricted gender roles once dominated the social consciousness of the past and how they continue to be an issue today that everyone is struggling to transform and reinvent so that future generations do not have to be so confined in what role they feel they should have to fulfill in order to be accepted into society. We eagerly invite you all to venture to the 8th floor and join us with your friends to share in the experience of these vintage games which are now on exhibit.



Libraries Receives Grant to Digitize Pan Am Archive

Prepare to soar through iconic 20th-century history.

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Pan American World Airways Bermuda Clipper, a Sikorsky S-42 flying boat, as it arrives in Bermuda, 1937.

University of Miami Special Collections is gearing up for a project to put over 100,000 items in the Pan Am archive online thanks to a digitization grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC).

In May the NHPRC announced the grant, one of five awarded nationwide, for Special Collections to digitize the items in the Pan American World Airways, Inc. Records collection. The archival collection—one of the University of Miami’s most popular and extensive—houses historical Pan Am brochures, newsletters, periodicals, annual reports, timetables, and many other records documenting the iconic company’s 60-plus years of operation.

“This is an opportunity to provide unprecedented access to Pan Am’s history, operations, and business culture,” says Sarah Shreeves, UM Libraries Associate Dean for Digital Strategies. “We thank the NHPRC for helping us make this extensive series available for researchers at any time of day and from anywhere in the world.”

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The Pacific by Clipper, 1947.

The 1.5-year project, which begins in October, will include the digitization of 60 boxes of printed materials and publications (known as the “printed materials series”) spanning from 1930 to 1991, which is almost the entire lifetime of the company, and covering all of the geographic areas serviced by the airline.

The digitization efforts build on a previous NHPRC-funded project completed in 2014 to organize the collection in its entirety—all 1,500 boxes of administrative, legal, financial, technical, and promotional materials as well as internal publications, photographs, audiovisual material, and graphic material. Online tools for researching the collection are available on the mini-website Cleared to Land.

“The project will continue our efforts to maximize the impact of the collection as a research resource,” says Beatrice Skokan, Manuscripts Librarian at Special Collections, who worked with head of Digital Production and principal investigator Laura Capell to secure the grant.

Once the printed series is digitized, the archive will be fully text searchable and available to the public free of charge.



New Project to Archive Efforts of UM’s LGBTQ+ Student Organization

By Koichi Tasa, University Archivist

tasa_headshot_largeI am currently working for the first time to archive a collection of electronic records with my colleague Laura Capell, Head of Digital Production and Electronic Archivist. The commemorable organization of focus is UM’s undergraduate LBGTQ+ group SpectrUM. We will archive messages and e-flyers documenting their organizational efforts in support of UM’s lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender, queer, and questioning community.

The collection was inspired by President Frenk’s December 2015 message on campus initiatives for inclusiveness towards LGBTQ+ students. I contacted SpectrUM to join their mailing list and have continued to save electronic records for the use of future students and researchers. We will make a decision shortly on how to provide access to the collection. For the time being, you can find more information on the collection in the finding aid.

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SpectrUM, organized in 1992, has expanded on the work of The Gay Alliance, which formed in the 1970s.

Working on this collection made me wonder about earlier gay and lesbian organizations at the University. Some historical information is available in The Miami Hurricane Archive Online. There I found an article from 1985 titled “Gay Student Seeks to Inform” by Sal O’Neill. O’Neill, who was a senior at that time, wrote about an earlier group called The Gay Alliance, formed in the early-to-mid 1970s. “The Alliance had weekly rap sessions in the Alliance’s office in the Student Union. They also sponsored regular dances at the Rathskeller which were open to the public,” he writes, also noting significant challenges– “fears of exposure and violence, and the apathy that any group must contend with”–that brought about its demise. In the 1980s, students could connect in an off-campus group called the Gay and Lesbian Youth Group, which offered “emotional support and social interaction to gay men and lesbians not available elsewhere up to the age of 25.”

The Lavender Celebration 2016 was sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs, Student Life, Toppel Career Center and Alumni Association.

The Lavender Celebration 2016 was sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs, Student Life, Toppel Career Center and Alumni Association to recognize the accomplishments of LGBTQ graduates of the U.

This was before SpectrUM, which was organized in 1992 (under the name Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Club). Its purpose is to foster pride through education, awareness, advocacy, and social events and to support all members of the LGBTQ+ community and their allies. It’s remarkable to see how far this mission has come, and we look forward to the opportunity of sharing its continuation with future students and researchers.

Stay tuned for announcements about future archival efforts. In an upcoming project in February 2017 we will work with groups such as the Black Alumni Society and United Black Students to curate a full exhibition at Richter Library on UM’s black students and faculty. The exhibition will coincide with the Black Alumni Society’s First Black Graduates Project. We look forward to collaborating with these and other campus organizations to honor their accomplishments.



UM Libraries Co-Host 2016 Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS) Conference

Librarians and archivists gathering for the 2016 Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS) conference brought their passion for rare books, old maps, pamphlets, letters, and history in many other forms to Coral Gables for a four-day discussion on bridging collections with potential users and donors across communities.

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Special Collections Librarian Jay Sylvestre leads a tour of rare materials in an “Instameet,” bringing together RBMS participants active in promoting resources through social media. Posts from this meet up can be found on Instagram using #InstaMeetUM.

More than 400 library professionals of colleges and universities nationwide came together for the nearly 60-year-old RBMS conference, hosted this year by the University of Miami Libraries and University of Florida Smathers Libraries, from June 20 to 24, on the theme of Opening Doors to Collaboration, Outreach and Diversity.

“It’s about making sure the diversity of our communities are being reflected in our collections, and finding ways to make them more accessible to all for greater enrichment and impact,” says Cristina Favretto, head of Special Collections and a 2016 conference organizer. Several of UM’s librarians participated in conference panels and workshops, held mainly at the Biltmore Hotel and additionally on the University of Miami’s Coral Gables campus.

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UM Libraries and UF Smathers Libraries hosted a reception at the Shalala Student Center on June 23.



New Library Catalog Now Live: Search, Browse, and Discover with uSearch

For the past year, UM’s nine libraries have been collaborating on a merger and migration to a new library management platform and catalog/discovery tool in order to streamline access to the University’s millions of library holdings. The new catalog, known as uSearch, went live May 19, uniting three separate catalogs from across the Coral Gables, Miller School of Medicine, and Rosenstiel campuses.

The library-wide effort was first announced to the University community in February. “Faculty and students on all campuses will be very pleased to discover that, with one search, resources from across the University’s libraries will be displayed on their screen,” said Professor of Law Sally Wise, chair of the Faculty Senate Library & Information Resources Committee and director of the Law Library.

Library users can explore uSearch from an interdisciplinary access point or focus their searches through the uSearch portals of Medical and Law libraries, which have been customized with additional search settings specific to those subject areas.

What does this mean for library users?

  • One catalog: All resources from Law, Medical (Calder, Ophthalmology, and UMH Libraries), Interdisciplinary (Richter), and the subject specialty libraries (Architecture, Business, Marine & Atmospheric Science, and Music) will be available in one catalog.
  • One search: Users will now be able to search all locally digitized/created resources from a single search field. This search includes digitized content from our distinctive collections, institutional repositories, and UM electronic theses and dissertations.
  • One login: Users will have a single means of authentication for most library resources (CaneID).*

Additionally users can look forward to enhanced communications on borrowed materials, including courtesy notices in advance of an item’s due date and loan and check-in receipts.

What do users get by logging in to the system?

While anyone may browse the catalog as a guest, signing in to the system provides users with access to a suite of services that includes:

  • the ability to request and/or place a hold on library materials
  • customize search preferences
  • save customized searches
  • save articles and catalog entries
  • add notes
  • create folders
  • export information to bibliographic software
  • receive alerts when new items are added that fit one’s search parameters, topics of interest, etc.

NOTE: Due to publisher licensing restrictions, results from some databases (e.g., Web of Science) only display if users are logged in.

Need help?

Find search tips and guidance on the use of specific uSearch features for interdisciplinary, Medical, and Law libraries:

Feedback and questions

We welcome your feedback and are grateful for your patience during this implementation process.

*Interlibrary Loan services of the Law and Medical libraries will remain independently operated by their respective departments.



Learn a new language!

 

 Mango Languages - Start A Conversation

LEARN NOW!

 

The University of Miami Libraries subscribe to Mango Languages, an interactive, online resource for learning a language.  Whether you are preparing for the trip of a lifetime, seeking personal or professional development, or learning English to settle in the U.S., Mango can help you start that essential conversation.  Every course, chapter, and lesson is designed to simulate the way people learn a foreign language when immersed in everyday life.

Mango may be used from anywhere you have an Internet connection — the library, your home, or even a smartphone using the free mobile apps for iOS and Android devices.  Explore fifty foreign language courses, as well as fifteen English as a Second Language classes, all taught by a variety of native language speakers.

It’s simple to get started.  Visit Mango Languages, create a profile, and start learning!

 

HOW MANGO WORKS

Vocabulary
Mango focuses on words and phrases that will be the most valuable in common, real-life situations for each specific language and culture.

Pronunciation
Mango’s course audio is recorded by native speakers, giving users the best possible models for their own pronunciation.  A voice comparison feature allows students to compare their pronunciation to the narrator’s, using a visual representation to note the differences.

Grammar
Grammar instruction is at the core of Mango’s methodology.  Since each lesson is based on actual conversation, Mango students are constantly learning grammar and sentence structure, at the same time that they’re learning vocabulary and pronunciation.

Culture
Mango integrates cultural insights into each lesson, ensuring that users develop an understanding of the expectations, customs, and etiquette of the culture they are studying.  This helps learners navigate the most appropriate language to use in particular situations and with different audiences.

 

The UM Libraries and Mango are your gateway to new opportunities.  Create your profile now!

For additional information, contact Lisa Baker, Education & Outreach Librarian.

 



Visioning Studio for the Future Learning Commons Opens at Richter Library

The Visioning Studio for the future Learning Commons is now open on the first floor of Richter Library.  Look for the large open space with the orange stripes brightening your path.

The Visioning Studio offers a place for the UM community to begin trying out different types of spaces, services, and technologies that the UM Libraries might offer in partnership with campus academic service units. Here is a sampling of what you’ll discover in the Visioning Studio this month:

    • Free tutoring provided by the Academic Resource Center begins in the Visioning Studio’s Consultation Hub on September 8 at 5 p.m. The service will be provided Monday – Thursday evenings from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. The sound in the Visioning Studio will increase accordingly to a collaborative, conversational level during these times.  When tutoring is not occurring, the Consultation Hub is available for open study.
    • Brightspot consultants will be leading user experience interviews and workshops with students and faculty in the Active-Learning Environment during the week of September 8. The goal of this research is to involve our students and faculty in the design of our future Learning Commons. We are grateful to all who are participating!
    • Check out the puzzle station in our prototype BrainSpa, where you can relax and reboot your mind. We are hoping to hear your ideas about other activities you might like to be able to do in the Learning Commons.

Share your vision with us!