POSTPONED | Adobe Creative Jam at UM

Due to the impact of Hurricane Irma, Adobe Creative Jam at the University of Miami will be rescheduled. Please stay tuned for more information regarding a new date for this event.

Questions?
Please send an email to richterevents@miami.edu or call 305-284-4026.


Presented with Adobe Creative Cloud, AIGA Miami, and Miami Dade College.







CHC Research Colloquia 2017-2018: Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellows Speak on their Research

The Cuban Heritage Collection’s 2017-2018 Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowship Research Colloquia kicks off in August with several talks by researchers who will be describing their works in progress.

​Colloquia are scheduled for 3 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Held at the Elena Díaz-Versón Amos Conference Room in the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion on second floor of the Otto G. Richter Library, these events are free and open to the public.

  • Tuesday, August 1
  • John Ermer, Florida International University (History)
    The Lebanese Mahjar in Cuba
  • Asiel Sepulveda, Southern Methodist University (Art History)
    City Impressions: Frédéric Mialhe and the Making of Nineteenth-Century Havana
  • Thursday, August 3
  • Lilianne Lugo Herrera, University of Miami (Modern Languages and Literatures)
    Transnational Black Bodies: Caribbean Perspectives on the Theater of the Cuban Diaspora
  • Thursday, August 10
  • Rodrigo Del Rio, Harvard University (Romance Languages and Literatures)
    Cuban Urban Imaginaries: Writing the City on the Verge of Revolution
  • Tuesday, August 15
  • Alberto Sosa Cabanas, Florida International University (Modern Languages)
    Racism, Celebration and Otherness: Depictions of Blackness in the Cuban Cultural Discourse (1790-1959)
  • Tuesday, August 22
  • Catherine Mas, Yale University (History, Program in the History of Science and Medicine)
    The Culture Brokers: Medicine, Anthropology, and Transcultural Miami, 1960-1990
  • Thursday, September 14
  • Elizabeth Cerejido, University of Florida (Art and Art History)
    Cuban (American) Art: Beyond Nation and Diaspora

Learn more about the Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowships »



Adobe Creative Cloud is Here – And it’s FREE!

Click the image to learn more.

UMIT and UM Libraries have partnered with Adobe to provide free access to Adobe Creative Cloud (CC) for all University of Miami faculty, staff, and students starting on August 1, 2017. The Adobe CC suite includes Acrobat Pro, Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, InDesign, free mobile apps for designing on the go, and much more! For a full list of available programs, please click here.

Download Adobe CC anytime after August 1, 2017 using the following link: it.miami.edu/adobecc

Need some assistance:
Do you want to create a poster or brochure? Perhaps you want to make a video or simply enhance your photos? The Digital Media Lab located in the Learning Commons (at the Otto G. Richter Library) provides expert project-based support and consultation in the use of Adobe Creative Cloud.  Whether you are a novice or a long-time user our staff is here to assist you. During staff hours, we are available to work with you to find a solution for any creative project you may have. Drop-ins are welcome, but appointments are better if you are new to Adobe or need more extensive one-on-one help.

Faculty members who are interested in integrating a digital aspect into their classes or assignments should consult with Vanessa Rodriguez, Digital Media Lab manager. We are available to instruct small groups of students or can help you come up with ideas for developing a digital media project your students can create.

To make an appointment for software consultation or class instruction please contact us at medialab@miami.edu or 305-284-2548.



2017-2018 Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowship Awards

The University of Miami Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) will welcome eleven new Goizueta Graduate Fellows beginning in July. Hailing from institutions across the United States, the 2017-2018 cohort of fellows is comprised of historians, literary specialists, and ethnicity scholars.

2017-2018 is the eighth year of the CHC’s graduate fellowships program. In 2015 the Goizueta Foundation made a $1 million gift to endow graduate fellowships at the Cuban Heritage Collection.

The Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowship Program provides assistance to doctoral students in the U.S. who wish to use the research resources available in the Cuban Heritage Collection at the University of Miami Libraries. The goal of the program is to engage emerging scholars with the materials available in the CHC and thus contribute to the larger body of scholarship in Cuban, Latin@, hemispheric, and international studies.

For more information about fellowship opportunities at the Cuban Heritage Collection or to learn about past fellows, click here.

Graduate Research Fellows

Elizabeth Cerejido
University of Florida (Art and Art History)
Cuban (American) Art: Beyond Nation and Diaspora

William Kelly
Rutgers University (History)
Revolución es [Re]construir: Housing Policy and Everyday Life in the Cuban Revolution, 1959-1989

Sara Kozameh
New York University (History)
Harvest of Revolution: Cuban Agrarian Reform and the Politics of Consent, 1958-1970

Catherine Mas
Yale University (History, Program in the History of Science and Medicine)
The Culture Brokers: Medicine, Anthropology, and Transcultural Miami, 1960-1990

Corinna Moebius
Florida International University (Global and Sociocultural Studies)
Transnational Racial Politics of Public Memory and Public Space in Little Havana’s Heritage District

Rosanne Sia
University of Southern California (American Studies and Ethnicity)
Performing Fantasy in Motion: The Hemispheric Circulation of Women Performers, 1940-1960

 

Graduate Pre-Prospectus Fellows

John Ermer
Florida International University (History)
The Lebanese Mahjar in Cuba

Lilianne Lugo Herrera
University of Miami (Modern Languages and Literatures)
Transnational Black Bodies: Caribbean Perspectives on the Theater of the Cuban Diaspora

Rodrigo del Rio
Harvard University (Romance Languages and Literatures)
Cuban Urban Imaginaries: Writing the City on the Verge of Revolution

Asiel Sepulveda
Southern Methodist University (Art History)
City Impressions: Frédéric Mialhe and the Making of Nineteenth-Century Havana

Alberto Sosa Cabanas
Florida International University (Modern Languages)
Racism, Celebration and Otherness: Depictions of Blackness in the Cuban Cultural Discourse (1790- 1959)



Mellon Grant Supports Library-Museum Collaboration

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (January 11, 2017)—The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded a $500,000 grant to the University of Miami to support collaboration between the Lowe Art Museum and UM Libraries on their joint effort to further faculty engagement with historical and artistic collections.

“This significant investment by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is vitally important and recognizes the immense potential of a strong library-museum collection to enhance learning and stimulate innovative and collaborative scholarship,” said UM President Julio Frenk.

The grant will enable the Lowe and the Libraries to establish two new faculty fellowships—one devoted to campus engagement and the other to the conservation of art and archival works on paper. In addition, it establishes a new programming fund to incentivize faculty to engage with University collections and enable the development of joint public programs that highlight these collections.

“We could not be more thrilled to have received this remarkable gift, and we are deeply grateful to the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for their generosity,” said Jill Deupi, Beaux Arts director and chief curator of the Lowe. “This transformative grant speaks to the value of higher education, the arts, and the humanities, generally. It equally affirms the power of collaboration and impact of leveraging resources for the benefit of a broad range of audiences.”

Charles Eckman, dean of the University of Miami Libraries, said the partnership was envisioned through the inaugural Academic Art Museum and Library Summit, held in January 2016, which brought together 14 pairs of library and museum directors from North American academic institutions to address opportunities for deep intra-institutional collaboration. “Through the support of the Mellon Foundation, the Lowe and Libraries will be able to work with faculty to carry out our vision for new curricular, interdisciplinary, and collaborative engagement and shared collection stewardship opportunities while providing invaluable experience to emerging professionals in the field,” Eckman said.

A white paper co-authored by Deupi and Eckman that reports on the findings of the 2016 AAML Summit is available in UM Libraries Scholarly Repository (scholarlyrepository.miami.edu).



Internationally Significant Collection Donated to UM, MDC

From left: Dr. Eduardo J. Padrón, Jay I. Kislak, and Dr. Julio Frenk

The internationally significant Jay I. Kislak Foundation collection will now have two permanent homes in South Florida – in the Special Collections Division of the University of Miami’s Otto G. Richter Library, in Coral Gables, and at Miami Dade College’s Freedom Tower, in downtown Miami. Assembled over the course of many decades, the Kislak collection includes some of the most important original source materials related to the history of the early Americas, such as two of the earliest published editions of the famous 1493 letter of Christopher Columbus.

The Jay I. Kislak Foundation, University of Miami (UM) and Miami Dade College (MDC) jointly announced the landmark donation of rare books, maps, manuscripts and other historic materials.

Jay Kislak, prominent collector, philanthropist and Miami resident for more than 60 years, has been a lifelong collector of rare books and historic artifacts focused particularly on Florida and the Caribbean, exploration, navigation and the early Americas. In 2004, he and the Jay I. Kislak Foundation donated more than 3,000 rare books, maps, manuscripts and objects to the Library of Congress, whose Kislak Collection now forms the basis of a major exhibition and extensive scholarly and public programs in Washington, D.C.

In UM and MDC, Kislak identified two local partners with the ability and desire to create similarly extensive educational and cultural programming in South Florida. The Kislak-MDC-UM partnership will encompass exhibitions, research, education and public outreach, all designed to serve MDC and UM students and faculty, residents of the local community, and a global scholarly network engaged in the study of Florida, early American history, and the cultures of the Caribbean and Latin America. Through an operating agreement, MDC and UM will collaborate on exhibits, collections care, and events and activities open to the public.

“I think this is an ideal partnership. We have the opportunity to combine the special resources of each institution and create exhibitions and programs that will be enjoyed by Miami-Dade residents and the millions of people who visit here from all over the world,” said Kislak.

“Miami Dade College is the largest and most diverse institution of higher education in the country, and is central to the educational, social, cultural and economic life of our community. Under the leadership of Dr. Eduardo J. Padrón, Miami Dade has emerged as a globally recognized institution,” he said.

“The University of Miami is among the nation’s top 50 research institutions, with a library that draws scholars from around the world. With the recent inauguration of Dr. Julio Frenk, this is an ideal time to establish the permanent repository in South Florida to conserve our collections and make them available to scholars and students for generations to come,” Kislak added.

The Kislak gift, representing a combined valuation of approximately $30 million, includes more than 2,300 rare books, maps, manuscripts, pre-Columbian artifacts and other historic materials.

UM and MDC will each receive a selection of important items. Each institution will receive a first edition of the famous 1493 letter of Christopher Columbus, in which the explorer described his New World discoveries to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain.

Other Kislak gift highlights include:

  • A 1486 edition of Ptolemy’s Cosmographia, among the most influential works in the history of cartography. A copy of this atlas was known to have been owned by Columbus.
  • A 1521 volume describing Cuba, by Italian historian Peter Martyr d’Anghiera, who wrote the first accounts of Spanish explorations in the Caribbean and Central and South America.
  • A 1589 volume, The Principal Navigations, Voiages and Discoveries of the English Nation, by English writer Richard Hakluyt, who was known for promoting the British colonization of North America.
  • A two-volume account of the 1804-1806 Lewis and Clark Expedition, commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson after the Louisiana Purchase.

The University of Miami’s share of the Kislak materials will become part of the Richter Library’s Special Collections Division, enhancing a collection highly regarded for its holdings of rare books and archives related to the cultural and political history of South Florida, the Caribbean Basin and South America, as well as its Cuban Heritage Collection of materials related to Cuba and the Cuban diaspora from colonial times to the present. The university is currently renovating its special collections center, which will be renamed the Kislak Center, envisioned as a hub of expanded educational and cultural programming, with lectures, fellowships, undergraduate and graduate courses utilizing the collection resources, and a new exhibit gallery featuring a broad range of materials from the Kislak collection.

“We are grateful to Jay Kislak for his extraordinary vision and lifelong devotion to creating a scholarly and culturally significant collection that showcases the rich history of Florida and the Caribbean,” said UM President Julio Frenk. “Our Special Collections will be home to these unique and exceptionally important materials from the Kislak Collection, and working with our partners at Miami Dade College, the University of Miami will have an unparalleled opportunity to engage our community in the history and culture of our hemisphere.”

Miami Dade College plans to create a permanent 2,600-square-foot public exhibition gallery in the Freedom Tower. The exhibit space will be located in the building’s main public area, adjacent to its ballroom and historic New World Mural, which celebrates Ponce de Leon’s 1513 discovery and naming of Florida.

“We are honored and privileged to receive such a significant gift and to work with such great partners. In a community as diverse as ours, we feel the responsibility to embrace and share the arts, culture and history with our students, faculty and residents,” said MDC’s President, Dr. Eduardo J. Padrón.

The two Miami institutions also expect to collaborate with the Library of Congress in studying and promoting all Kislak collections and making them accessible to audiences throughout Florida and the region.

“For 500 years, Florida has been a focal point of global exploration and cultural exchange,” Kislak said. “I’m thrilled that Miami’s top two institutions of higher education, along with the Library of Congress, will now be using our collections to reveal the fascinating and important role of our community in world history.



Camner Family Donates Rare Musical Treasures

University of Miami Trustee Alfred Camner, his wife, Anne Camner, and their four children, all of whom are UM alumni, have made a donation to the University of rare and valuable scores composed by musical giants—from Beethoven to Gershwin—that were printed and bound during the composers’ lives.

Alfred, J.D. ’69, and Anne, J.D. ’72, along with children Danielle Camner Lindholm J.D. ’95, Errin Camner L.L.M. ’99, Lauren Camner Winter M.B.A. ’98, and Andrew Camner B.A. ’09, donated several hundred scores, collectively forming the Camner Family Music Collection, to the Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library and Technology Center at the Frost School of Music, where it will be available to UM students, researchers, and the public.

“It is our family’s desire that this collection of first and early printed music editions form the true start to creating an extraordinary musicological resource, unmatched by modern editions,” said Alfred Camner, who, with his wife, also endowed UM’s Camner Center for Academic Resources.

The collection features historical works spanning three centuries and with origins in many parts of the world. Collection materials include rare lithography-printed and leather-bound editions of Christoph Willibald Gluck’s Alceste (1767), Georges Bizet’s Carmen (1875), and Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring (1913), among many others published between the 18th and 20th centuries.

Shelton Berg, dean of the Frost School, calls the gift a “transformative” resource for members of the Frost School and beyond. “When we look at a recently published score of a musical work from 100 years ago or more, we are seeing the music as something ‘from the past,’” Berg says. “Conversely, when a student performer or researcher examines an original edition score, with the marginal notations, the music is suddenly ‘in the present.’ They are experiencing it in the time of its creation. It’s hard to describe the exhilaration that produces.”

The Camner Collection arrives as the University is preparing to carry out new initiatives supporting educational innovation and encouraging new pedagogical approaches in the classroom. Frank Cooper, research professor emeritus at the Frost School, says this timing is important. “In an age where electronic media have taken over, there are no research materials to compare to original objects, in this case, printed scores from the times of the composers themselves. How invaluable for researchers today and for many generations to come.”

In details such as marginal notations, Camner says, the collection reveals how scores were studied and used in practice, in concerts, and in opera houses through time. Additionally, notes may point to how the music has evolved. “There is no substitute for the feeling a scholar or music student gets from handling a score that might have been used by Beethoven or Verdi or Puccini or Stravinsky, scores published in their lifetimes, edited by them, and often later corrected or changed,” Camner says. “These first and early editions are the closest we get to a sense of the time and place and world of the composer, a time when the composers often depended on the sales of these scores for their livelihoods.”

Nancy Zavac, who heads the Weeks Music Library, says that the Camner Collection brings a new level of research prestige to the library, which houses a wide range of musicology resources, including modern books, journals, and recordings, as well as unique and distinctive materials. “All music librarians are eager to have treasures in their collections. The Camner Collection is such a thing. It is exciting for me and my staff to care for, and greatly enhances our holdings.”

Dean of Libraries Charles Eckman expressed deep gratitude to the Camner Family for donating this important collection. “Miami is notable for the presence of several individual collectors of rare and unique cultural and bibliographic treasures,” he said. “The Camner Family is to be commended for their appreciation of the scholarly and teaching value of this private collection, and we celebrate their generosity of spirit in enabling the exposure and application this collection will have at the University of Miami for current and future generations of researchers and students.”