Spring Events 2016

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events-header_mailChimp-15_draft02Hop into the Jalopy: Tales of “On-the-Road” Genealogical Research

6:30 p.m.
 

Otto G. Richter Library, 3rd floor
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day 2016, Professor Bill Walker, former university librarian at the University of Miami and the New York Public Library’s Andrew W. Mellon Director Emeritus of the Research Libraries, invites you to join him on his travels to unlock his Irish ancestors’ pasts. Using his own work as an example, Walker sheds light on the rewarding process of genealogical research using a variety of resources. Learn more.

 

events-header_mailChimp-23_draft01The Map Thief Book Talk + Signing

6:30 p.m.
 

Special Collections, University of Miami
Otto G. Richter Library, 8th floor
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

Presented in partnership with Books & Books.

A discussion with author and journalist Michael Blanding on his latest book, The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps. Earning praise from Publishers Weekly, the Wall Street Journal, and many others, this investigative work delves into the untold history E. Forbes Smiley III, esteemed and respectable antiquarian map dealer, who spent years doubling as a map thief until he was arrested in 2005. Learn more.

 

events-header_mailChimp-30_draft03Book Launch for The State and the Grassroots: Immigrant Transnational Organizations in Four Continents

4 p.m.; Reception to follow from 6-7 p.m.
 

Cuban Heritage Collection
Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion, Otto G. Richter Library
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

Presented with the Miami Institute for the Americas and Department of Sociology.

Featuring discussion with co-author and Princeton and UM Professor Dr. Alejandro Portes and invited speakers Harvard scholar Dr. Jorge Domínguez and UM Professor of Law David Abraham with closing remarks by UM President Julio Frenk. Learn more.

RSVP to Miami Institute for the Americas at MIA@miami.edu or call 305-284-9535.

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events-header_mailChimp-20_draft01NERDLab Play Day

7-9 p.m.
 

Visioning Studio for the Future Learning Commons
Otto G. Richter Library, 1st floor
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

Presented with the Department of Cinema and Interactive Media.

 

events-header_mailChimp-20_draft01The Future of Academic Publishing

4 p.m.
 

Otto G. Richter Library, 3rd floor
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

Presented with the Center for the Humanities.

Featuring:

  • Peter Berkery, Executive Director, Association of University Presses (AAUP)
  • Peter Potter, Director of Publishing Strategy, University Libraries, Virginia Tech

 

events-header_mailChimp-21_draft01Research Creativity Innovation Forum (RCIF) Awards

5:30 p.m.
 

Visioning Studio for the Future Learning Commons
Otto G. Richter Library, 1st floor
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

Presented with the Office of Undergraduate Research.
 

UPCOMING: Caribbean Diaspora Oral History Project Reception

The Caribbean Archive at the University of Miami Special Collections reflects profoundly upon what community can mean for universities and their libraries.

As one of the oldest archives on campus, its founding materials came from some of UM’s earliest supporters, their donations of rare and historical books and records driving some of the first archival efforts at the institution—then commonly called the “Pan American University.”

Today the archive is an important draw for scholars and researchers from around the world, with materials stretching back to the 1700s. Learn more.



Pop Culture Series: Batman vs. Superman

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by James Wargacki, Education and Outreach

With the release of Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice later this month, two pop culture icons from the golden age of comic books will finally meet face-to-face on the silver screen. While both Batman and Superman have been longtime friends and allies, their differing ideologies have brought them into conflict on more than one occasion.

The most iconic battle between the Dark Knight and the Man of Steel occurred in the pages of Frank Miller’s classic story The Dark Knight Returns. Published in 1986, the story follows an older and battle-worn Batman coming out of retirement to save Gotham from the uncontrolled lawlessness and corruption that has plagued the city, a fight that quickly puts him at odds with the Gotham City Police Department. The vigilante superhero is quickly pursued for arrest, which escalates with the President of the United States sending in Superman to apprehend the Dark Knight, and ends in a battle that levels an entire city block.

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Batman and Superman battle it out in Injustice: Gods Among Us.

Not to be outdone by the epic battle in The Dark Knight Returns, Frank Miller once again pitted Batman against Superman in his 2001 series The Dark Knight Strikes Again. Set three years after the events of The Dark Knight Returns, Batman once again resurfaces from a self-imposed exile to round up old friends to battle the totalitarian regime of Brainiac and President Lex Luthor. Frustrated with Batman’s heavy-handed approach, Superman attacks Batman and his army in the Batcave. With the aid of friends including The Flash, Green Arrow, The Atom, Catgirl, and a pair of kryptonite infused gauntlets, Batman subdues Superman in a battle that nearly destroys the Batcave.

In 2003, Scottish writer Mark Millar set Batman and Superman on a collision course in his limited series Superman: Red Son, which is set in the Soviet Union. Superman is aiding the Soviet government in a “…a never-ending battle for Stalin, socialism, and the international expansion of the Warsaw Pact” when he is first noticed by the young orphan who becomes Batman. When Superman eventually takes control of the Communist party, using his powers to create a utopia in his beloved homeland–while using tactics such as electronic lobotomies towards anyone who opposes him—Batman wages a guerilla war against the Superman regime.

The most recent and still ongoing battle between Batman and Superman takes place in the pages of the Injustice: Gods Among Us which acts as a prequel to the video game of the same name. The series opens with Joker targeting Superman instead of Batman. After Superman is subjected to Joker’s madness firsthand, he decides that Batman’s methods are not effective for preventing crime. With the aid of former members of the Justice League, Superman begins to take over the earth and punish criminals without prejudice. Batman gathers his own team of heroes to challenge Superman’s newly formed dictatorship.

With plenty of source material to choose from, Batman vs. Superman has all the components necessary to be as intense of a battle as Superman and Batman have ever had.  If you would like to know more about Batman and Superman, be sure to check out some of the following materials from the Richter Library.

Books

DVDs



Class Project Breathes Life into Historical Documents

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Stereoscopic card showing black men with wheelbarrows and shovels with caption, “Negroes at work near Cristobal, Panama.” Slave Documents Collection, University of Miami Special Collections

In her own academic career, English professor and PhD candidate Allison Harris has spent a significant amount of time in archives, using records dating back to the historical periods she’s studying to support research and to breathe life into her writing. Taking her African-American Literature students to the archives for a project focused on the era of slavery, however, was an idea actually inspired in a cemetery, miles away from the archives.

“I was walking there with a friend and we were thinking about the lives of the people buried there and the legal and social constructions of personhood beyond death,” Harris explains. It was in the midst of gravestones, many inscribed with only a name and a range of dates, that she thought about how the briefest details of a person’s life can evoke wonder about a long ago experience. “Together we brainstormed ways that students could use creative writing to engage with these constructions of personhood.”

After the students enrolled in Harris’s course visited UM Special Collections’ Slave Documents Collection in the fall 2015 semester, they created stories based on real individuals from history referenced in letters by plantation owners, bills of sale, and other legal and personal documents preserved from the pre-Civil War era. The eight short stories, together known as the Slave Narrative project, are told from the perspective of slaves documented in the records.

“Part of the goal of the assignment was to make the documents come to life through plot and conflict. But more importantly, they were to give their characters a rich and vibrant interiority that explored the emotional and spiritual limitations and silences of these archives,” Harris says.

Visit the Slave Narrative Project

The Slave Narrative project, now permanently preserved and available to the public in UM Libraries Scholarly Repository, features the following short stories:

The Example
by Nathaniel Bradley
English Literature major (2018) from Aurora, Colorado

Her Taste of Freedom
by Orlandra Dickens
Sociology and Criminology major (December 2016) from Wilson, North Carolina

The Hill, Named after some White Man
by O’Shane Elliot
Political Science major (Spring 2016) from St. Petersburg, Florida

The Match
by Marcus Hines
Computer Science major (2017) from Los Angeles, California

Betsey Simons: Freedom at What Cost?
by Anthony Maristany
Neuroscience major (May 2017) from Miami, Florida

Earth and Ashes
by Michele Mobley
General Studies major (2017) from Wilmington, Delaware

A Narrative of the Torments and Unlikely Freedom of a Child Slave
by Hanna Taylor
Undecided major (2019) from San Rafael, California

Nameless People, Keep Trekking
by Brandi Webster
Sociology major (2017) from Naranja, Florida

To learn more about the Slave Documents Collection, visit Special Collections in person or online at library.miami.edu/specialcollections.



Now on View at Weeks Music Library: Video Game Music

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Mario, from the Super Mario Bros. series

Over the last few decades, video games have blossomed from simple entertainment to a vibrant art form and one of the world’s fastest-growing industries. As appreciation for the medium has grown, the music of video games has become particularly celebrated. It is thus with great pride that Weeks Music Library has begun curating a collection of video game soundtracks and scores to promote and support the study of this music within the Frost School of Music and across the University of Miami. Our growing collection highlights the music of games released from the 1980s to today, and heavily features the work of American and Japanese composers. A selection of these materials is currently on display at Weeks Music Library. You can also browse our collection in the catalog.





Visioning Studio for the Future Learning Commons Opens at Richter Library

The Visioning Studio for the future Learning Commons is now open on the first floor of Richter Library.  Look for the large open space with the orange stripes brightening your path.

The Visioning Studio offers a place for the UM community to begin trying out different types of spaces, services, and technologies that the UM Libraries might offer in partnership with campus academic service units. Here is a sampling of what you’ll discover in the Visioning Studio this month:

    • Free tutoring provided by the Academic Resource Center begins in the Visioning Studio’s Consultation Hub on September 8 at 5 p.m. The service will be provided Monday – Thursday evenings from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. The sound in the Visioning Studio will increase accordingly to a collaborative, conversational level during these times.  When tutoring is not occurring, the Consultation Hub is available for open study.
    • Brightspot consultants will be leading user experience interviews and workshops with students and faculty in the Active-Learning Environment during the week of September 8. The goal of this research is to involve our students and faculty in the design of our future Learning Commons. We are grateful to all who are participating!
    • Check out the puzzle station in our prototype BrainSpa, where you can relax and reboot your mind. We are hoping to hear your ideas about other activities you might like to be able to do in the Learning Commons.

Share your vision with us!