Now On View: An Entrée to Regional Fares and Flavors

culinary_22x28_draft05-web

Three exhibitions explore the rich culinary traditions of South Florida, Cuba, and the Caribbean as documented in library collections and outside works, from family recipes and photographs of kitchens to cookbooks, restaurant postcards, and iconic menus.

Tropical Gastronomies: Documenting the Food Cultures of South Florida

Surveying the complex food history of South Florida starting with the earliest uses of tropical crops, this exhibition highlights restaurants of the tourism boom, the emergence of Caribbean flavors, and the local impact of modern fresh-food trends. This exhibit is located on Richter Library’s first floor.

Food and Memory: An Exploration of Cuban Cooking, 1857-today

Featuring books, ephemera, and photographs from the Cuban Heritage Collection that illustrate the idea of a distinct Cuban cuisine and how this cuisine shaped the way Cuban culture developed. This exhibit is located on Richter Library’s second floor.

Spare Beauty: The Cuban Kitchen

Highlighting the work of food and travel photographer Ellen Silverman from her travels to Cuba, where she was welcomed into people’s kitchens and found “sparse spaces where time has stopped.” This exhibit is located on Richter Library’s second floor.





UM’s Cuban Heritage Collection Celebrates the Legacy of Maestro Manuel Ochoa

by Rosa Monzon, Cuban Heritage Collection

The exhibit includes a digital component through which viewers can watch videos of performances conducted by Maestro Ochoa.

The exhibition includes a digital component through which viewers can watch videos of Ochoa’s performances.

Maestro Manuel Ochoa, a Cuban exile musician, choral and orchestra conductor, and founder of the Miami Symphony Orchestra, was the focus of a reception at the Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC), at the University of Miami’s Otto G. Richter Library. The event served as the official launch of an exhibition that includes Ochoa’s greatest works and documented memories, which are preserved and available for research at the CHC in the Manuel Ochoa Papers.

Ochoa is recognized internationally not only for his numerous contributions to classical Cuban music in the island but also his work in Spain, Austria, and the United States.

Curated by Meiyolet Mendez, librarian at the CHC, the exhibition displays photographs, letters, publications, music scores, and concert programs of Ochoa’s personal life and career. Included is a photograph from the beginning of Ochoa’s career, at the age of 17, conducting members of the Holguin Choral Society, which he created in 1942, even before he had any formal training. Another photograph shows Ochoa leading the Belen Jesuit Choir in Havana years later. Ochoa’s lesson plans and notes on working with child choir singers also are on display.

“One of the most exciting parts of working on this exhibit was the opportunity to bring to life Maestro Ochoa’s entire career,” said Mendez. “I discovered a person who was passionate about music and music education, and who loved sharing that passion with others.”

Also on display is a paper program of the Concierto Sacro, sponsored by the Cuban Catholic Artists Guild, featuring Ochoa’s Coro de Madrigalistas (Madrigal Choir), popularly noted as the best choir in Cuba, in 1956, Havana.

A driving force and inspiration in Ochoa’s life was always his family. One of the highlights of the exhibition is a photograph of his mother, Caridad Ochoa, who was a trained opera singer, plus a tear sheet from The Miami Herald with an article by David Lawrence Jr. celebrating Ochoa as well as his wife and biggest supporter, Sofia Ochoa.

“She was at his side every step of the way,” said their son, Manuel Ochoa Jr. “My father always said she made it easy for him to just stand at a podium and conduct.”

CHC recognized Sofia Ochoa (right) during the event.

Esperanza Bravo de Varona (left), former chair of the CHC, and current chair Maria Estorino recognized Sofia Ochoa (right) during the event.

Sofia’s unwavering support for her husband continued after his death, in 2006. She not only donated his collection but also contributed countless hours as a volunteer in the processing of these records.

“When my mother and I thought about how we would remember and commemorate my father, we wanted a living memorial,” said Ochoa Jr. “We wanted to share his life story so that others, especially young Cubans and Cuban-Americans would be inspired to continue his musical legacy.”

After studying and working in Cuba, Vienna, Spain, and Rome, Ochoa settled in Miami following the Cuban Revolution. On display are photographs of Ochoa’s performances in Miami, such as the first Festiva Symphony Concert at the Colonel Hotel in 1989. There is also a photograph of acclaimed Cuban pianist Zenaida Manfugás, from the same concert.

In Miami Ochoa also created the Society of Arts and Culture of Americas, but his greatest contribution to the city’s cultural development was the creation and leadership of the Miami Symphony Orchestra for more than 25 years. Multiple playbills from its concerts are displayed in the CHC’s Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion, as well as audio and videos of performances.

Guests at the reption.

The celebration of Ochoa’s life and legacy took place at CHC’s Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion, where the Manuel Ochoa Papers are now permanently housed and available for research.

Considered “the highlight of his tenure with the orchestra,” said Ochoa Jr., was a concert in Carnegie Hall in June of 2000, also represented in the exhibition.

“Maestro Ochoa’s legacy lives on in the Miami Symphony Orchestra he founded and in the lives that he touched through his various cultural activities,” said Maria Estorino, chair of the CHC. “But it also lives on here, in the library, where through his own papers, his life, his work, and his passion can be discovered.”

The CHC is home to thousands of books, manuscripts, photographs, and other materials that document the rich history and culture of Cuba and its diaspora. The legacy of Maestro Manuel Ochoa, as well as countless other Cubans and Cuban-Americans, “will not only be preserved here, but it will be shared with our students and with the community,” said Estorino.

“I hope the Maestro Manuel Ochoa Collection continues to inspire and educate future generations to become musicians and conductors, and keep alive the rich tradition of classical music,” Ochoa Jr. said.

The exhibition is available for viewing through the end of summer. For more information about the Cuban Heritage Collection and its events, please visit www.library.miami.edu/chc.

View more photos from the event here.

Photos by Andrew Innerarity.

The exhibit will be available at the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion through summer 2015.

The exhibition is on view at the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion through the end of the summer.



Interruption in Service for Off-Site Materials from April 20 to May 6

Construction-Alert200x200There will be an interruption in service for retrieving research and special collections materials stored off-site (as indicated in the catalog) from April 20 to May 6 due to the ongoing construction project.

Following this time, access to these materials will resume on a limited basis and require advance notice. Please contact the appropriate person below regarding near-future use of off-site materials. (Please note that this project will only affect access to materials that are stored off-site. For materials housed on-site at our libraries and collections, regular access will apply throughout the project.)

  • For questions about UML’s off-site collections, please contact Cheryl Gowing, Associate Dean, Library Information Systems & Access, at cgowing@miami.edu or 305-284-6018.
  • From the Cuban Heritage Collection, please contact Meiyolet Mendez, CHC Librarian, at meimendez@miami.edu or 305-284-5854.
  • From Special Collections, please contact Cristina Favretto, Head of Special Collections, at cfavretto@miami.edu or 305-284-3247.
  • From University Archives, please contact Koichi Tasa, University Archivist, at k.tasa@miami.edu or 305-284-8129.

For general inquiries about this project, please contact library.communications@miami.edu.

 


 

UML Renovation Update: Temporary Access Procedures to Off-Site Materials

The University of Miami Libraries (UML) is beginning the first phase of renovations to Brockway Hall, a historic space on the first floor of Richter Library that will serve as the new home of Special Collections and University Archives.

Starting April 2, we will be relocating materials that are currently shelved at Brockway Hall to UML’s off-site storage facility in Miami Lakes. This will result in limited access to materials stored off-site (as indicated in the catalog) from our general collections as well as those from Special Collections, University Archives, and the Cuban Heritage Collection. Further details will soon follow on temporary procedures during each project phase for requesting these materials. Stay tuned for these updates on our website.

We will also be launching a website in the coming weeks that will provide more information about the new space and include detailed updates on this project.

In the meantime, please contact us with any questions pertaining to near-future use of off-site materials. (Please note that this project will only affect access to materials that are stored off-site. For materials housed on-site at our libraries and collections, regular access will apply throughout the project.)

  • For questions about UML’s off-site collections, please contact Cheryl Gowing, Associate Dean, Library Information Systems & Access, at cgowing@miami.edu or 305-284-6018.
  • From the Cuban Heritage Collection, please contact Meiyolet Mendez, CHC Librarian, at meimendez@miami.edu or 305-284-5854.
  • From Special Collections, please contact Cristina Favretto, Head of Special Collections, at cfavretto@miami.edu or 305-284-3247.
  • From University Archives, please contact Koichi Tasa, University Archivist, at tasa@miami.edu or 305-284-8129.

For general inquiries about this project, please contact library.communications@miami.edu.

We thank you for your patience during this time, and look forward to updating you on this exciting project.



Trial Now Available: Joanna Briggs Institute Database

Attention Nursing & Health Studies Students and Faculty:

A 30-day trial of the Joanna Briggs Institute database, open to the UM community, is now available through Tuesday, May 5.

The trial offers full access to the database, including the following resources:

  • Evidence based recommended practices
  • Evidence summaries
  • Best practice information sheets
  • Systematic reviews and systematic review protocols
  • Consumer information sheets
  • Technical reports

START THE TRIAL

For questions about using this resource, or to provide feedback about its potential usefulness for your research and teaching, please contact Nursing Librarian Vera Spika at vms40@miami.edu.



UML Celebrates the 15th Annual International Edible Book Festival

by Sarah Block, Library Communications

Screen Shot 2015-04-02 at 5.40.57 PM

Click the image to view more photos from the event.

The April Fools’ Day tradition of “eating your words” took the form of a feast Wednesday, April 1, in an event at UM’s Otto G. Richter Library that served literary entrées such as “Game of Scones,” “The Count of Monte Crispo,” and “The Com-Plate Works of William Shakespeare.” The playful spread of book-inspired creations were cooked up from across the University community taking part in the library’s celebration of the Edible Book Festival, an event established in 2000 that has sprinkled across libraries and universities worldwide.

“The Edible Book Festival celebrates the intellectually nourishing power of books in a fun and creative way,” says Kelly Miller, associate dean of Learning and Research Services at the University of Miami Libraries (UML).

Kathryn Garcia created "Love in the Time of Chlorophyll," which was inspited by Gabriel García Márquez's "Love in the Time of Cholera."

Student Kathryn Garcia created “Love in the Time of Chlorophyll,” which was inspired by Gabriel García Márquez’s Love in the Time of Cholera.

The lure for creating and then devouring edible books is strong. Hundreds participated in UML’s fifth Edible Book Day event by viewing and voting on a total of 18 entries, resulting in four winners: Wittiest, “Game of Scones” by Hunter Hewitt; Healthiest, “The Berry Hungry Caterpillar” by Cheryl Gowing; Most Edible, “Telltale Candy Heart” by Vanessa Rodriguez; and Best in Show, “Book of Flowers” by Louisa Norris.

Education and Outreach Librarian Terri Robar, who served as chair of UML’s 2015 festival, says the event has a special draw for readers of varying genres and literary interests. “It’s a way for them to use their imaginations to create something based on the literature that inspires them, and they have a lot of fun translating that into an edible form.”

Entries have only two basic requirements: they must relate to a book, and they must be edible. Hunter Hewitt, a UM student majoring in neuroscience whose take on Game of Thrones won the award for Wittiest, says figuring out the best way to make fantasy elements from the series such as dragon eggs and a wolf’s head into an actual edible form took some research. “[In coming up with “Game of Scones,”] I had no idea scones were so diverse. There were options from sweet to savory with multitudes of combinations along the way.”

_G7A4011-web

Louisa Norris won Best in Show for her entry, “Book of Flowers.”

UML has distinct ties to the festival through its co-founder Beatrice Corón, whose handmade works from cut-paper are housed in Special Collections as part of the department’s growing artist’s books collection. “Artist’s books, like edible books, transcend the boundaries of traditional book forms,” says Cristina Favretto, head of Special Collections, and former chair of UM’s festival. “They engage viewers in a very active and visceral way.”

Whet your appetite on the full spread of edible books here.

_G7A4025-web

After winners are announced all who are present are welcome to dig in to the books.



UML Renovation Update: Temporary Access Procedures to Off-Site Materials

Construction-Alert200x200The University of Miami Libraries (UML) is beginning the first phase of renovations to Brockway Hall, a historic space on the first floor of Richter Library that will serve as the new home of Special Collections and University Archives.

Starting April 2, we will be relocating materials that are currently shelved at Brockway Hall to UML’s off-site storage facility in Miami Lakes. This will result in limited access to little-used materials stored off-site (as indicated in the catalog) from our general collections as well as those from Special Collections, University Archives, and the Cuban Heritage Collection. Further details will soon follow on temporary procedures during each project phase for requesting these materials. Stay tuned for these updates on our website.

We will also be launching a website in the coming weeks that will provide more information about the new space and include detailed updates on this project.

In the meantime, please contact us with any questions pertaining to near-future use of off-site materials. (Please note that this project will only affect access to materials that are stored off-site. For materials housed on-site at our libraries and collections, regular access will apply throughout the project.)

  • For questions about UML’s off-site collections, please contact Cheryl Gowing, Associate Dean, Library Information Systems & Access, at cgowing@miami.edu or 305-284-6018.
  • From the Cuban Heritage Collection, please contact Meiyolet Mendez, CHC Librarian, at meimendez@miami.edu or 305-284-5854.
  • From Special Collections, please contact Cristina Favretto, Head of Special Collections, at cfavretto@miami.edu or 305-284-3247.
  • From University Archives, please contact Koichi Tasa, University Archivist, at tasa@miami.edu or 305-284-8129.

For general inquiries about this project, please contact library.communications@miami.edu.

We thank you for your patience during this time, and look forward to updating you on this exciting project.



CHC receives funding to digitize La Gaceta de La Habana

La Gaceta de La Habana

Gaceta de La Habana, 1889

The Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) at the University of Miami Libraries has received $29,850 from LAMP and LARRP to digitize its oversize holdings of the nineteenth-century newspaper La Gaceta de La Habana. LAMP (formerly the Latin American Microform Project) and LARRP (Latin Americanist Research Resources Project) are entities devoted to preserving and providing access to Latin American and Caribbean cultural heritage material and are administered by the Center for Research Libraries.

The CHC holds issues of La Gaceta from 1849 to 1899, representing one of the most complete sets of the newspaper publicly available outside of Cuba. Funding from LAMP and LARRP will cover the cost to digitize over 27,000 pages in 44 oversized bound volumes of the newspaper spanning from 1849 to 1886. The 22 volumes for the years 1887-1897, which are smaller in size, are being digitized in-house by the Libraries’ Digital Production unit.

La Gaceta de La Habana was the newspaper of record for the Spanish colonial government in the second half of the nineteenth century in Cuba.  La Gaceta was the successor to Diario de La Habana, which was published until 1848, when it changed its name to La Gaceta de La Habana: Periódico Oficial del Gobierno.  In turn, it was succeeded by La Gaceta Oficial de la República de Cuba in 1902.

The social, cultural, legislative, and commercial information published in the pages of La Gaceta is of interest not only to scholars of Cuban Studies, but also scholars of Atlantic, Caribbean, and Latin American Studies. Digitizing this considerable work will open avenues of research to faculty and students around the world and help preserve an important historical resource.

Meiyolet Méndez, CHC Librarian, and Laura Capell, Head of Digital Production and Electronic Records Archivist, are leading this project.



Richter Recommends: DVD Picks That’ll Have You Fooled

by Terri Robar, Education & Outreach Librarian

In honor of April Fool’s Day, we offer the following suggestions. All of these movies share one thing in common. At the end, (spoiler alert!) you get blindsided by a plot twist that makes you reevaluate everything you just watched. For each movie we summarize the plot and reveal the twist on which the entire story hinges. READ AT YOUR OWN RISK!

The following films are a part of Richter Library’s DVD collection, which can be searched by movie theme (or topic) as well as categories such as time period, genre, or language. Visit library.miami.edu/UDVD to view the entire collection.
 

Donnie

The Plot: After an airplane engine crashes through his bedroom, Donnie Darko is visited by Frank, a life-size rabbit who warns him of the oncoming apocalypse and inspires him to carry out crimes.
The Twist: At the moment the apocalypse is supposed to take place, Darko travels back in time, dying in the crash in his bedroom.

American

The Plot: Patrick Bateman, a wealthy, entitled businessman in 1980s New York City, leads a double life as a serial killer.
The Twist: In the final scene, Bateman learns many of his victims are supposedly still alive—he may have imagined everything.

Fight

The Plot: An unnamed narrator and his new friend, Tyler Durden, begin a “fight club” that turns into a national movement.
The Twist: The narrator is suffering from dissociative identity disorder – he and Tyler are the same person.

Sixth

The Plot: After a home invasion, Dr. Malcolm Crowe, a child psychologist, returns to work by attempting to help a young boy who sees the dead.
The Twist: Dr. Crowe is actually dead.

Scream

The Plot: A masked serial killer targets a group of high schoolers. At a party to celebrate school’s closure following the killings, the murderer kills Sidney’s boyfriend, Billy, then hunts Sidney and her friends.
The Twist: The murderer is actually two people: Billy and his friend, Stu.

Usual

The Plot: Five criminals plot against the police after being called in for a crime they didn’t commit, but begin to uncover a larger plot stemming from legendary criminal Keyser Soze. The question is, who is he?
The Twist: Keyser Soze is the unreliable narrator himself, “Verbal” Kint.

Empire

The Plot: As the Rebel Alliance runs from Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker trains to become a Jedi Knight.
The Twist: Luke abandons his training to save his friends from Vader but ends up in battle with the Sith Lord. Get ready for what is arguably the most famous film quote of all time: “Luke, I am your father.”

chinatown-1974

The Plot: The wife of a prominent bureaucrat hires a private investigator to follow her husband, whom she suspects of infidelity. Along the way, the PI uncovers murder plots, corruption and a young girl, Evelyn’s sister, who is somehow involved.
The Twist: Evelyn reveals her sister is also her daughter—Evelyn was in an incestuous relationship with her father.

psycho

The Plot: Marion Crane is murdered at a desolate motel by the mentally-ill mother of its shifty owner, Norman Bates.
The Twist: Bates murdered his mother years before, then developed a split personality that made him believe he is his mother. He murdered Marion disguised as his mother.

Planet

The Plot: Three astronauts crash-land on an unknown planet after traveling at light-speed for 2,000+ years. In this new land, non-human primates—gorillas, orangutans and chimpanzees—rule the world, while Homo sapiens are considered second-class citizens.
The Twist: The film’s final scene sees the surviving astronaut stumbling across a half-sunken Statue of Liberty on the shore—he’s been on earth the whole time.

jfAZ2cSWdSeft2BYl6InUe16PQN

The Plot: The film opens with newspaper magnate Charles Foster Kane on his deathbed, where his last word is “rosebud.” This inspires a journalist to chronicle the enigmatic life of the mogul, uncovering his ruthless quest for power and fortune.
The Twist: “Rosebud” is the name of Kane’s childhood sled—proving the tycoon had a touch of sentimentality after all.

oldboy

The Plot: After being kidnapped and imprisoned for 15 years, Oh Dae-Su is released, only to find that he must find his captor in 5 days.
The Twist: The woman he has fallen in love with is his long-lost daughter.