Spring Events 2016

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events-header_mailChimp-15_draft02Hop into the Jalopy: Tales of “On-the-Road” Genealogical Research

6:30 p.m.
 

Otto G. Richter Library, 3rd floor
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day 2016, Professor Bill Walker, former university librarian at the University of Miami and the New York Public Library’s Andrew W. Mellon Director Emeritus of the Research Libraries, invites you to join him on his travels to unlock his Irish ancestors’ pasts. Using his own work as an example, Walker sheds light on the rewarding process of genealogical research using a variety of resources. Learn more.

 

events-header_mailChimp-23_draft01The Map Thief Book Talk + Signing

6:30 p.m.
 

Special Collections, University of Miami
Otto G. Richter Library, 8th floor
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

Presented in partnership with Books & Books.

A discussion with author and journalist Michael Blanding on his latest book, The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps. Earning praise from Publishers Weekly, the Wall Street Journal, and many others, this investigative work delves into the untold history E. Forbes Smiley III, esteemed and respectable antiquarian map dealer, who spent years doubling as a map thief until he was arrested in 2005. Learn more.

 

events-header_mailChimp-30_draft03Book Launch for The State and the Grassroots: Immigrant Transnational Organizations in Four Continents

4 p.m.; Reception to follow from 6-7 p.m.
 

Cuban Heritage Collection
Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion, Otto G. Richter Library
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

Presented with the Miami Institute for the Americas and Department of Sociology.

Featuring discussion with co-author and Princeton and UM Professor Dr. Alejandro Portes and invited speakers Harvard scholar Dr. Jorge Domínguez and UM Professor of Law David Abraham with closing remarks by UM President Julio Frenk. Learn more.

RSVP to Miami Institute for the Americas at MIA@miami.edu or call 305-284-9535.

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events-header_mailChimp-20_draft01NERDLab Play Day

7-9 p.m.
 

Visioning Studio for the Future Learning Commons
Otto G. Richter Library, 1st floor
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

Presented with the Department of Cinema and Interactive Media.

 

events-header_mailChimp-20_draft01The Future of Academic Publishing

4 p.m.
 

Otto G. Richter Library, 3rd floor
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

Presented with the Center for the Humanities.

Featuring:

  • Peter Berkery, Executive Director, Association of University Presses (AAUP)
  • Peter Potter, Director of Publishing Strategy, University Libraries, Virginia Tech

 

events-header_mailChimp-21_draft01Research Creativity Innovation Forum (RCIF) Awards

5:30 p.m.
 

Visioning Studio for the Future Learning Commons
Otto G. Richter Library, 1st floor
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL

Presented with the Office of Undergraduate Research.
 

UPCOMING: Caribbean Diaspora Oral History Project Reception

The Caribbean Archive at the University of Miami Special Collections reflects profoundly upon what community can mean for universities and their libraries.

As one of the oldest archives on campus, its founding materials came from some of UM’s earliest supporters, their donations of rare and historical books and records driving some of the first archival efforts at the institution—then commonly called the “Pan American University.”

Today the archive is an important draw for scholars and researchers from around the world, with materials stretching back to the 1700s. Learn more.



Graphic Novels Spotlight: Batman vs. Superman

by Bill Jacobs & Sean P. Ahearn, Learning & Research Services

Image Credit: Zap-Kapow Comics

The long awaited film Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice brings two of the most iconic characters in graphic novel history together for an all-out brawl! It’s no secret that their clash will somehow come to a peaceful conclusion, showing us the origins of the Justice League. But before there were many there were two. With this post we present to you an opportunity to make the comparison for yourself – Batman vs. Superman.

We have pulled from our collection a series of match-ups to best represent Batman and Superman throughout their long careers and various interpretations. We hope to pique your interest in some of the many characters that are a part of our Graphic Novels Collection.

First, we open with: origin stories – who are they and where do they come from?


Batman Year One

Frank Miller’s noir take on how Batman’s career started has defined modern conceptions of Batman for decades! Year One shows the evolution of Batman’s crime-fighting methods and relationship with Commissioner (then Officer) Gordon.

Superman Birthright

Mark Waid’s sunny but complex, updated version of the Man of Steel is set in the 21st century and is the basis for most modern tales of Superman’s youth. Birthright fills a gap left when Superboy was removed from the story in 1986.

Round 2: Mash-up series show our heroes taking on pop culture icons!

A Tale of the Batman: Gotham by Gaslight

This Elseworlds story pits a Victorian era Batman against the mysterious Butcher of Whitechapel. No one knows his identity. Most people know him only as Jack the Ripper.

Superman vs. Muhammad Ali : The Fight to save Earth from Star-Warriors

To save the planet from the evil alien Scrubb the world’s greatest champion is called, but who will it be? Faster than a speeding bullet Superman or Float like a butterfly Muhammad Ali?

Next, the Golden Age: From 1930 to 1950 the American superhero archetypes were born and grew rapidly.

Batman: The Sunday Classics, 1943-1946

Sunday Batman strips as they were originally published in the newspapers in the 1940s. Follow the Caped Crusader’s original adventures.

The Superman Chronicles

Reprints the first earliest adventures of Superman in chronological order, beginning with his first appearance in Action Comics in 1938.

Finally: Rogues Gallery. Superheroes can only be measured by the super-villains they face.

Hush

Batman’s relationship with Catwoman intensifies as an unknown foe, Hush, trains the Dark Knight’s adversaries, including the Joker and Harley Quinn to wear down Batman, Robin, and Nightwing with a gauntlet of villains before their final showdown.

Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?

Ten years after Superman’s disappearance, Lois Lane recounts his final days when his roster of foes, mysteriously more powerful and vicious than ever, attacked his friends and laid siege to the Fortress of Solitude. Who is the surprise villain behind the master plan and how can Superman save the day?

You make the comparison! And tell us what you think on Twitter or Facebook.

About the Collection

UML’s Graphic Novels collection of more than 1,000 volumes includes newspaper comic strips, Japanese manga, European bande dessinee, and alternative American comics, in addition to superhero stories. Along with high-flying, wall-crawling, planet-saving scenarios, there are detectives tracking down lost library books, demon-fighting ronan, and wine tasting competitions. Many of the unusual storylines are woven into commentary on deeper issues, such as racial history, mass media, and philosophy. Some graphic novels avoid the fantastic entirely, and instead tell mystery stories, autobiography, and graphic essays.



UM Historical Materials Showcased at Inauguration 2016

By Koich Tasa and Sarah Block

Staff and student assistants at the University Archives recently caught a glimpse of the enormous effort in producing large-scale events when they assisted in planning the celebration of President Frenk’s inauguration, which took place during the last week of January 2016.

The University Archives, which houses  a vast expanse of records documenting the history of the University of Miami, provided research and exhibition assistance for the “Firsts at UM” event on January 27 in the Newman Alumni Center as well as the inaugural ceremony, which was held on January 29 at the Bank United Center.

Koichi Tasa says December to January was the busiest time in the decade he has served as University Archivist. “In these months, we gained valuable experience through collaboration with colleagues outside of the UM Libraries,” Tasa said. “We were proud to help bring UM history to life through the materials we preserve.”

President Frenk holding the Second Ceremonial Mace of the UM. Photo Courtesy of University Communications

Working with the Office of the President, University Communications, and other University departments, Tasa and his staff culled information as well as artifacts, including more than 300 high-resolution images for a video that aired at the event and past inaugural addresses and programs from three previous inauguration ceremonies.

The department’s materials were also featured in an exhibit at “Firsts at UM,” in which President Frenk and UM historian and author Arva Moore Parks discussed key moments throughout the 90-year history of the U. Guests, including several pioneers and trailblazers, viewed and engaged with prized memorabilia such as the second commencement mace of the University and the commencement cap and gown worn by the first University president Ashe. Official portraits of the former five UM presidents, also housed by the Archives, were on display.

“Inauguration 2016 was an opportunity, in addition to showcasing our collections and services, to take an active part in the history as it’s being made,” Tasa says. “An unexpected benefit from this experience was that we got to learn more about our wonderful colleagues, who are already proposing ideas for the U’s centennial celebration in 2026.”

In order to assist in facilitating these ideas, Tasa says the University Archives plans to reach out to more schools, departments, and student groups to archive their organizational history. “We believe that such efforts would be a tremendous help for the next historian to write a new book about the University of Miami at the centennial anniversary.”



Cuban-Americans Welcome President Frenk and Dr. Knaul

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (March 3, 2016) — University of Miami President Julio Frenk and his wife, Dr. Felicia Knaul, director of the Miami Institute for the Americas and professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the Miller School of Medicine, shared in a celebration of Cuban history and heritage at a special dinner welcoming them to South Florida’s Cuban-American community and raising support for the mission of the Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC).

“The more I learn about the Cuban Heritage Collection, the more inspired and excited I feel about its future,” President Frenk said in his address to more than 250 guests, including community and University leaders, longtime supporters, and new friends of the CHC, gathered at the Newman Alumni Center on March 1.

“An Evening with the Cuban Heritage Collection: Welcoming President Julio Frenk and Dr. Felicia Knaul” was hosted by the Amigos of the Cuban Heritage Collection, the fundraising arm of the CHC that supports a wide array of programming aimed at expanding and furthering access to the collection.

Located at the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion in the Otto G. Richter Library, the CHC houses the largest repository of historical materials on Cuba outside of the island.

“The Cuban Heritage Collection is more than documents, rare materials, and videos. It is the profound and personal testament of the people of Cuba,” said Amigos Chair Aldo Leiva, who co-chaired the event with Aida Levitan.

Frenk and Knaul visited the CHC soon after their arrival at the University in 2015, each taking part in tours of the archives. Knaul, as director of the Miami Institute for the Americas, said she looks forward to opportunities for scholarly collaboration with the CHC that will continue to “bring researchers from around the world to use this collection in its full depth.”

Proceeds from the event will support the CHC’s pursuit of “The Goizueta Challenge,” a fundraising opportunity that promises a $1 million unrestricted operating endowment from The Goizueta Foundation if the CHC raises $500,000 in donations. Dean and University Librarian Charles Eckman announced during the evening that the CHC had recently reached the halfway mark to the challenge.

“The support of many in this room will help sustain and expand programming such as oral history projects, exhibitions, events, digital collections, and new collection initiatives,” Eckman said.

Sponsors for the event included Mariita and George Feldenkreis; Fragomen, Del Rey, Bersen & Loewy, LLP; Leon Medical Centers; Morrison, Brown, Argiz & Farra, LLC; NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises; Ambassador Paul L. and Trudy Cejas; Century Homebuilders Group, LLC; FedEx Express, Latin America and Caribbean Division; Cuban American National Foundation; Enrique J. Sosa, Ph.D; Hogan Lovells, LLP; Iusfinder Abogados, Madrid; Knight Foundation; Professional Bank; The Bared Family Foundation, Inc.; U.S. Century Bank; Bacardi U.S.A., Incorporated; and Trias Flowers.



The Map Thief Book Talk by Michael Blanding on March 23

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The Map Thief
The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps

Wednesday, March 23, 2016
6:30 p.m.
Reception to follow

Special Collections
Otto G. Richter Library, 8th floor
University of Miami | 1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL 33146

Presented in partnership with Books & Books.

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP to richterevents@miami.edu or call 305-284-4026

Maps have long exerted a special fascination on viewers—both as beautiful works of art and practical tools to navigate the world. For those that collect them, however, the map trade can be a cutthroat business, inhabited by quirky and in some cases disreputable characters in search of a finite number of extremely rare objects. Michael Blanding’s The Map Thief delves into the untold history E. Forbes Smiley III, esteemed and respectable antiquarian map dealer, who spent years doubling as a map thief until he was finally arrested while delicately tearing maps out of books in the Yale University Library in 2005. He would later confess to the theft of 97 maps valued at over $3m total, and serve 42 months in prison for his crimes.

Praised by Publishers Weekly, the Wall Street Journal, and many others, the book includes the results of an exclusive interview with Smiley before he went quiet, as well as the other individuals involved; from the dealers he worked with to the librarians affected by Smiley’s theft. Though Smiley swears he has admitted to all of the maps he stole, the libraries he victimized have uncovered hundreds more they accuse him of taking—along with some intriguing clues to prove it.

About the Author
3-BlazerSmile-crop_300x450Michael Blanding is the author of The Coke Machine: The Dirty Truth Behind the World’s Favorite Soft Drink (Avery, 2010), and a journalist with more than 15 years of experience writing long-form narrative and investigative journalism. Previously a staff writer and editor at Boston magazine, Blanding has since freelanced for publications including WIRED, Slate, The Nation, The New Republic, Consumers Digest, and the Boston Globe Magazine, where he has focused on investigative stories involving intensive research and interviews. Blanding has been named a senior fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, and a network fellow at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. An amateur map lover, Blanding has a collection of international subway maps and bought his first antiquarian map while reporting this book.

 


 

Please click map image below to enlarge. Contact us at 305-284-4026 or richterevents@miami.edu with questions about directions and parking.

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Remembering President Foote at the University Archives

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Edward T. Foote, 4th President of the University of Miami

Written by Koichi Tasa and Sarah Block

Staff at the University Archives were saddened by the news of President Foote’s passing on Monday. University Archivist Koichi Tasa and Archives Assistant Marcia Heath each have fond memories of assisting the former president with archival materials during his tenure.

“President Foote was a very kind person who was always willing to give his time and knowledge to help others,” says Heath, who helped the former president contribute materials to his presidential archive from 2002 to 2008.

Tasa got to know President Foote in 2010 when he contacted the Archives for assistance in accessing his papers. “He was a very important leader for the U and for our local community,” Tasa said. “We would like to express our sincere condolences to the family.”

A summary of Foote’s legacy is featured in the current exhibition Pan American University: The Original Spirit of the U Lives On, located on the first floor of Otto G. Richter Library:

During the time that Edward T. “Tad” Foote II was formally named the fourth president of the University of Miami, South Florida was in the midst of a crisis. Social instability shook many parts of Miami following a rapid surge in immigration with the Mariel boatlift from Cuba as well as race riots over the death of Arthur McDuffie, both of which occurred in 1980.

Foote, seemingly undaunted by the area’s problems, saw only the opportunity for UM to work closer with the community. In his inauguration speech, he spoke of creating a special task force at UM to examine how the University could offer any assistance to those working to solve immediate community problems. It was also Foote who beautified the campus itself, developing a comprehensive landscape plan for the University that would transform it into a magnificent botanical garden—a living laboratory.

President Foote’s presidential papers, preserved by the University Archives, will be available to the public after 2030 upon approval of the Office of the President.

Case 7 of the Richter Exhibition "Pan American University" dedicated to President Foote

Case  dedicated to President Foote in Pan American University: The Original Spirit of the U Lives On, on view at Richter Library.



Class Project Breathes Life into Historical Documents

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Stereoscopic card showing black men with wheelbarrows and shovels with caption, “Negroes at work near Cristobal, Panama.” Slave Documents Collection, University of Miami Special Collections

In her own academic career, English professor and PhD candidate Allison Harris has spent a significant amount of time in archives, using records dating back to the historical periods she’s studying to support research and to breathe life into her writing. Taking her African-American Literature students to the archives for a project focused on the era of slavery, however, was an idea actually inspired in a cemetery, miles away from the archives.

“I was walking there with a friend and we were thinking about the lives of the people buried there and the legal and social constructions of personhood beyond death,” Harris explains. It was in the midst of gravestones, many inscribed with only a name and a range of dates, that she thought about how the briefest details of a person’s life can evoke wonder about a long ago experience. “Together we brainstormed ways that students could use creative writing to engage with these constructions of personhood.”

After the students enrolled in Harris’s course visited UM Special Collections’ Slave Documents Collection in the fall 2015 semester, they created stories based on real individuals from history referenced in letters by plantation owners, bills of sale, and other legal and personal documents preserved from the pre-Civil War era. The eight short stories, together known as the Slave Narrative project, are told from the perspective of slaves documented in the records.

“Part of the goal of the assignment was to make the documents come to life through plot and conflict. But more importantly, they were to give their characters a rich and vibrant interiority that explored the emotional and spiritual limitations and silences of these archives,” Harris says.

Visit the Slave Narrative Project

The Slave Narrative project, now permanently preserved and available to the public in UM Libraries Scholarly Repository, features the following short stories:

The Example
by Nathaniel Bradley
English Literature major (2018) from Aurora, Colorado

Her Taste of Freedom
by Orlandra Dickens
Sociology and Criminology major (December 2016) from Wilson, North Carolina

The Hill, Named after some White Man
by O’Shane Elliot
Political Science major (Spring 2016) from St. Petersburg, Florida

The Match
by Marcus Hines
Computer Science major (2017) from Los Angeles, California

Betsey Simons: Freedom at What Cost?
by Anthony Maristany
Neuroscience major (May 2017) from Miami, Florida

Earth and Ashes
by Michele Mobley
General Studies major (2017) from Wilmington, Delaware

A Narrative of the Torments and Unlikely Freedom of a Child Slave
by Hanna Taylor
Undecided major (2019) from San Rafael, California

Nameless People, Keep Trekking
by Brandi Webster
Sociology major (2017) from Naranja, Florida

To learn more about the Slave Documents Collection, visit Special Collections in person or online at library.miami.edu/specialcollections.



Hop into the Jalopy

hopJalopy-header-jmc_1000x307Hop into the Jalopy
Tales of “On-the-Road” Genealogical Research

Tuesday, March 15, 2016
6:30 p.m.

Otto G. Richter Library, 3rd Floor
University of Miami | 1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL 33146

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP to richterevents@miami.edu or call 305-284-4026

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day 2016, Professor Bill Walker, former university librarian at the University of Miami and the New York Public Library’s Andrew W. Mellon Director Emeritus of the Research Libraries, invites you to join him on his travels to unlock his Irish ancestors’ pasts.

Travel with Bill as he visits cemeteries and courthouses, small-town historical societies and public libraries, and the villages and streets where these early nineteenth-century settlers lived. This adventure delves into the lives of his great grandmothers, Harriet Bogle and Jane McCullough, two very determined and rugged pioneer women. Using his own work as an example, Walker sheds light on the rewarding process of genealogical research using a variety of resources. In addition to making use of online information, Bill Walker is a strong advocate for stepping away from the computer and taking to the road.

Please join us for a festive reception and genealogy presentation.

 


 

Please click map image below to enlarge. Contact us at 305-284-4026 or richterevents@miami.edu with questions about directions and parking.

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