UML Celebrates the 15th Annual International Edible Book Festival

by Sarah Block, Library Communications

Screen Shot 2015-04-02 at 5.40.57 PM

Click the image to view more photos from the event.

The April Fools’ Day tradition of “eating your words” took the form of a feast Wednesday, April 1, in an event at UM’s Otto G. Richter Library that served literary entrées such as “Game of Scones,” “The Count of Monte Crispo,” and “The Com-Plate Works of William Shakespeare.” The playful spread of book-inspired creations were cooked up from across the University community taking part in the library’s celebration of the Edible Book Festival, an event established in 2000 that has sprinkled across libraries and universities worldwide.

“The Edible Book Festival celebrates the intellectually nourishing power of books in a fun and creative way,” says Kelly Miller, associate dean of Learning and Research Services at the University of Miami Libraries (UML).

Kathryn Garcia created "Love in the Time of Chlorophyll," which was inspited by Gabriel García Márquez's "Love in the Time of Cholera."

Student Kathryn Garcia created “Love in the Time of Chlorophyll,” which was inspired by Gabriel García Márquez’s Love in the Time of Cholera.

The lure for creating and then devouring edible books is strong. Hundreds participated in UML’s fifth Edible Book Day event by viewing and voting on a total of 18 entries, resulting in four winners: Wittiest, “Game of Scones” by Hunter Hewitt; Healthiest, “The Berry Hungry Caterpillar” by Cheryl Gowing; Most Edible, “Telltale Candy Heart” by Vanessa Rodriguez; and Best in Show, “Book of Flowers” by Louisa Norris.

Education and Outreach Librarian Terri Robar, who served as chair of UML’s 2015 festival, says the event has a special draw for readers of varying genres and literary interests. “It’s a way for them to use their imaginations to create something based on the literature that inspires them, and they have a lot of fun translating that into an edible form.”

Entries have only two basic requirements: they must relate to a book, and they must be edible. Hunter Hewitt, a UM student majoring in neuroscience whose take on Game of Thrones won the award for Wittiest, says figuring out the best way to make fantasy elements from the series such as dragon eggs and a wolf’s head into an actual edible form took some research. “[In coming up with “Game of Scones,”] I had no idea scones were so diverse. There were options from sweet to savory with multitudes of combinations along the way.”

_G7A4011-web

Louisa Norris won Best in Show for her entry, “Book of Flowers.”

UML has distinct ties to the festival through its co-founder Beatrice Corón, whose handmade works from cut-paper are housed in Special Collections as part of the department’s growing artist’s books collection. “Artist’s books, like edible books, transcend the boundaries of traditional book forms,” says Cristina Favretto, head of Special Collections, and former chair of UM’s festival. “They engage viewers in a very active and visceral way.”

Whet your appetite on the full spread of edible books here.

_G7A4025-web

After winners are announced all who are present are welcome to dig in to the books.



UML Renovation Update: Temporary Access Procedures to Off-Site Materials

Construction-Alert200x200The University of Miami Libraries (UML) is beginning the first phase of renovations to Brockway Hall, a historic space on the first floor of Richter Library that will serve as the new home of Special Collections and University Archives.

Starting April 2, we will be relocating materials that are currently shelved at Brockway Hall to UML’s off-site storage facility in Miami Lakes. This will result in limited access to little-used materials stored off-site (as indicated in the catalog) from our general collections as well as those from Special Collections, University Archives, and the Cuban Heritage Collection. Further details will soon follow on temporary procedures during each project phase for requesting these materials. Stay tuned for these updates on our website.

We will also be launching a website in the coming weeks that will provide more information about the new space and include detailed updates on this project.

In the meantime, please contact us with any questions pertaining to near-future use of off-site materials. (Please note that this project will only affect access to materials that are stored off-site. For materials housed on-site at our libraries and collections, regular access will apply throughout the project.)

  • For questions about UML’s off-site collections, please contact Cheryl Gowing, Associate Dean, Library Information Systems & Access, at cgowing@miami.edu or 305-284-6018.
  • From the Cuban Heritage Collection, please contact Meiyolet Mendez, CHC Librarian, at meimendez@miami.edu or 305-284-5854.
  • From Special Collections, please contact Cristina Favretto, Head of Special Collections, at cfavretto@miami.edu or 305-284-3247.
  • From University Archives, please contact Koichi Tasa, University Archivist, at tasa@miami.edu or 305-284-8129.

For general inquiries about this project, please contact library.communications@miami.edu.

We thank you for your patience during this time, and look forward to updating you on this exciting project.



CHC receives funding to digitize La Gaceta de La Habana

La Gaceta de La Habana

Gaceta de La Habana, 1889

The Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) at the University of Miami Libraries has received $29,850 from LAMP and LARRP to digitize its oversize holdings of the nineteenth-century newspaper La Gaceta de La Habana. LAMP (formerly the Latin American Microform Project) and LARRP (Latin Americanist Research Resources Project) are entities devoted to preserving and providing access to Latin American and Caribbean cultural heritage material and are administered by the Center for Research Libraries.

The CHC holds issues of La Gaceta from 1849 to 1899, representing one of the most complete sets of the newspaper publicly available outside of Cuba. Funding from LAMP and LARRP will cover the cost to digitize over 27,000 pages in 44 oversized bound volumes of the newspaper spanning from 1849 to 1886. The 22 volumes for the years 1887-1897, which are smaller in size, are being digitized in-house by the Libraries’ Digital Production unit.

La Gaceta de La Habana was the newspaper of record for the Spanish colonial government in the second half of the nineteenth century in Cuba.  La Gaceta was the successor to Diario de La Habana, which was published until 1848, when it changed its name to La Gaceta de La Habana: Periódico Oficial del Gobierno.  In turn, it was succeeded by La Gaceta Oficial de la República de Cuba in 1902.

The social, cultural, legislative, and commercial information published in the pages of La Gaceta is of interest not only to scholars of Cuban Studies, but also scholars of Atlantic, Caribbean, and Latin American Studies. Digitizing this considerable work will open avenues of research to faculty and students around the world and help preserve an important historical resource.

Meiyolet Méndez, CHC Librarian, and Laura Capell, Head of Digital Production and Electronic Records Archivist, are leading this project.



Richter Recommends: DVD Picks That’ll Have You Fooled

by Terri Robar, Education & Outreach Librarian

In honor of April Fool’s Day, we offer the following suggestions. All of these movies share one thing in common. At the end, (spoiler alert!) you get blindsided by a plot twist that makes you reevaluate everything you just watched. For each movie we summarize the plot and reveal the twist on which the entire story hinges. READ AT YOUR OWN RISK!

The following films are a part of Richter Library’s DVD collection, which can be searched by movie theme (or topic) as well as categories such as time period, genre, or language. Visit library.miami.edu/UDVD to view the entire collection.
 

Donnie

The Plot: After an airplane engine crashes through his bedroom, Donnie Darko is visited by Frank, a life-size rabbit who warns him of the oncoming apocalypse and inspires him to carry out crimes.
The Twist: At the moment the apocalypse is supposed to take place, Darko travels back in time, dying in the crash in his bedroom.

American

The Plot: Patrick Bateman, a wealthy, entitled businessman in 1980s New York City, leads a double life as a serial killer.
The Twist: In the final scene, Bateman learns many of his victims are supposedly still alive—he may have imagined everything.

Fight

The Plot: An unnamed narrator and his new friend, Tyler Durden, begin a “fight club” that turns into a national movement.
The Twist: The narrator is suffering from dissociative identity disorder – he and Tyler are the same person.

Sixth

The Plot: After a home invasion, Dr. Malcolm Crowe, a child psychologist, returns to work by attempting to help a young boy who sees the dead.
The Twist: Dr. Crowe is actually dead.

Scream

The Plot: A masked serial killer targets a group of high schoolers. At a party to celebrate school’s closure following the killings, the murderer kills Sidney’s boyfriend, Billy, then hunts Sidney and her friends.
The Twist: The murderer is actually two people: Billy and his friend, Stu.

Usual

The Plot: Five criminals plot against the police after being called in for a crime they didn’t commit, but begin to uncover a larger plot stemming from legendary criminal Keyser Soze. The question is, who is he?
The Twist: Keyser Soze is the unreliable narrator himself, “Verbal” Kint.

Empire

The Plot: As the Rebel Alliance runs from Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker trains to become a Jedi Knight.
The Twist: Luke abandons his training to save his friends from Vader but ends up in battle with the Sith Lord. Get ready for what is arguably the most famous film quote of all time: “Luke, I am your father.”

chinatown-1974

The Plot: The wife of a prominent bureaucrat hires a private investigator to follow her husband, whom she suspects of infidelity. Along the way, the PI uncovers murder plots, corruption and a young girl, Evelyn’s sister, who is somehow involved.
The Twist: Evelyn reveals her sister is also her daughter—Evelyn was in an incestuous relationship with her father.

psycho

The Plot: Marion Crane is murdered at a desolate motel by the mentally-ill mother of its shifty owner, Norman Bates.
The Twist: Bates murdered his mother years before, then developed a split personality that made him believe he is his mother. He murdered Marion disguised as his mother.

Planet

The Plot: Three astronauts crash-land on an unknown planet after traveling at light-speed for 2,000+ years. In this new land, non-human primates—gorillas, orangutans and chimpanzees—rule the world, while Homo sapiens are considered second-class citizens.
The Twist: The film’s final scene sees the surviving astronaut stumbling across a half-sunken Statue of Liberty on the shore—he’s been on earth the whole time.

jfAZ2cSWdSeft2BYl6InUe16PQN

The Plot: The film opens with newspaper magnate Charles Foster Kane on his deathbed, where his last word is “rosebud.” This inspires a journalist to chronicle the enigmatic life of the mogul, uncovering his ruthless quest for power and fortune.
The Twist: “Rosebud” is the name of Kane’s childhood sled—proving the tycoon had a touch of sentimentality after all.

oldboy

The Plot: After being kidnapped and imprisoned for 15 years, Oh Dae-Su is released, only to find that he must find his captor in 5 days.
The Twist: The woman he has fallen in love with is his long-lost daughter.







Join Us for “The Coevolution of Texts & Technology” by Cheryl Geisler on March 19

The Coevolution of Texts & Technology
Cheryl Geisler
Simon Fraser University

Thursday, March 19, 2015 | 1:30 p.m.
Third Floor Conference Room
Otto G. Richter Library

 

cherylGeisler_comp2As scholars of writing, we know the two-facedness of text. First, we know text as something contingent, an artifact that emerges out of process and circumstance, a thing with meaning and function embedded in orality and materiality. Second, we also know text as a cultural object, one that aspires to be fixed and unchanging, which claims to rise above circumstance to serve as an authoritative source. My career has been preoccupied with exploring the mechanisms and consequences of this two-facedness across the disciplines, first in academic philosophy, next in engineering design, and most recently in the context of the new technologies. I have argued that the mechanism and consequences of this two-facedness lies in understanding text as a kind of technology, one built by humans to do specific work in the world, while at the same time operating as a kind of black box into which we can pry only with some difficulty.   In the twentieth century, this work has constructed what Smith called documentary reality and it still within this framework that a great deal of what we teach about writing functions today. In the twenty-first century, however, much evidence suggests that texts are undergoing a second revolution as they are embedded in a host of new media technologies beginning with instant messaging in 1997 to Twitter (2006) and its successors. These are texts with characteristics quite distinct from those we encounter in our writing centers and classes: They have a different scope to their interaction. They bend time and space in different ways. And they do work in the world that we need to better understand.

 

About Cheryl Geisler
Cheryl Geisler is Professor of Interactive Arts and Technology at Simon Fraser University where she served as the inaugural Dean of the Faculty of Communication, Art and Technology. She has written extensively on the nature of texts, especially those mediated by new technologies (http://jbt.sagepub.com/content/25/3.toc). Her work focusing on the promotion of women in the academic ranks was recently published in Science (17, 2012), the flagship journal of the AAAS. She was the principal investigator on the just published Designing for User Engagement on the Web: 10 Basic Principles from Routledge (2014). A recognized expert on verbal data coding, she is the author of Analyzing Steams of Language (2004) and conducts an annual international workshop on verbal data analysis at Dartmouth College. She has received awards for her work from Computers and Composition, the Rhetoric Society of America, and the National Communication Association.

uml_community-black_600x143



2015 Annual International Edible Book Festival at Richter Library

ebf-banner_600x136

The University of Miami Libraries (UML) is calling for submissions to the 15th annual International Edible Book Festival. A popular event here at UM and universities worldwide, the festival celebrates the intellectually nourishing power of books in a fun and creative way—by turning them into edible art. UML’s 2015 festival will take place on April 1, 12-2:30 p.m., at the Otto G. Richter Library.

ebf_registerButton-pink

Due to popular demand, the deadline to register has been extended through Monday, March 30.

History

The Edible Book Festival is the dreamchild of Judith Hoffberg, a librarian and champion of artists’ books, and Beatrice Coron, a visual storyteller and book artist. (Many of Coron’s works are held in UML’s Special Collections.) Celebrated since 2000 in various parts of the world, the festival involves the creation, display, and eating of edible books. It generally falls on or around April 1, partly a nod to the April Fools’ tradition of “eating your words,” as the official website explains.

This year marks UML’s fifth celebration of the Edible Book Festival. View past entries »

 

Examples of past entries

Examples of past entries (from left): Bite Club, The Da Vinci Cod, The Picture of Dorito Gray, The Catcher in the Rye

Schedule

9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.: Edible books entries accepted
Noon to 1:30 p.m.: Public viewing and judging
1:30 to 2 p.m.: Votes counted and prizes awarded
2 to 2:30 p.m.: Entries eaten by participants and viewers

How to Participate

ebf-judgingCategoriesAll UM students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend or participate in the festival by submitting an edible book, either as an individual or with a team. Your submission can be based on any kind of book, including a novel, diary, biography, pop-up book, comic, picture book, or artist’s book. How it’s reinvented into an edible form is completely up to you. All contest participants should register now.

The first fifty contestants will receive a commemorative UML Edible Book Festival apron when they submit their entry on April 1.

 

Rules

  • Entries must be edible and inspired by a book.
  • Entries should hold their shape while on display (about 2.5 hours without refrigeration).
  • Entries must be delivered to Richter Library on April 1 by 11:30 a.m. You are welcome to display your book inspiration (or cover image) alongside your entry.
  • If you believe that your entry qualifies for the “Healthiest” prize, please submit a list of ingredients on or before the festival day.

ebf_registerButton

For additional questions, please email ediblebooks@miami.edu.



Richter Recommends: DVDs Both Sweet and Savory

by Terri Robar, Education & Outreach Librarian

Having a snack while watching a movie is a longstanding tradition. These films will make you extra hungry. All of these revolve around humankind’s great obsession with food and drink.

The following films are a part of Richter Library’s DVD collection, which can be searched by movie theme (or topic) as well as categories such as time period, genre, or language. Visit library.miami.edu/UDVD to view the entire collection.

babette

Almost a quarter-century after the film’s release, the culminating scene of this quietly urgent Danish drama still stands as the most beautifully rendered depiction of a lavish meal ever committed to celluloid. But it’s not just spectacle for spectacle’s sake: The triumphant banquet sequence also communicates volumes about the movie’s central theme, the eternal tug-of-war between self-denial and sensual gratification.

ratatoille

Charm is not the first word that springs to mind when you envision a rat running loose in a restaurant kitchen, but that’s exactly what this animated kids’ flick has—in spades. Oh, and an evil food critic named Anton Ego, voiced by Irish acting institution Peter O’Toole.

Like Water for Chocolate (1993)463f8

An enchanting magical realist drama from Mexican director Alfonso Arau, about the power of food to…make every guest at a wedding begin to sob uncontrollably, cause a woman to become so turned on that her clothes catch fire, conjure a visit from vengeful ghosts, and more. If you’ve ever doubted the sensual power of a recipe, then you definitely need to watch this movie.

Chocolat_sheet

The primary ingredients of Lasse Hallström’s whimsical tale included Juliette Binoche, as a single mother who moves to a tiny French village in the 1960s; Johnny Depp, as a riverboat-dwelling drifter; and, yes, a certain sweet, cacao-based substance that wins over the closed hearts of all those stuffy petits-bourgeois.

WILLY_WONKA_2D_DVD_PACKSHOT

Impoverished Charlie Bucket, along with four other kids and their parental guests, wins a coveted golden ticket to enter the fantastic realm of Wonka’s mysterious confectionery. After the other kids have proven themselves to be irresponsible brats, it’s Charlie who impresses Wonka and wins a reward beyond his wildest dreams. But before that, the tour of Wonka’s factory provides a dazzling parade of delights.

eatdrink

Taiwanese-American director Ang Lee made his name with this depiction of an emotionally repressed Taipei family. The central character is a master chef whose only real means of communicating with his three headstrong daughters is via the elaborate Sunday dinner he cooks for them every week. By turns funny and poignant, this is a beautifully balanced study that well deserved its foreign-film Oscar nomination.

sideways

More than just a buddy picture or a road-trip movie, Sideways is about something every foodie flirts with at some point: obsession. Hats off to Paul Giamatti for creating a character who—between his fumbling flirtations with a waitress and his tragic downing of a 1961 Château Cheval Blanc in a Styrofoam cup—so perfectly straddles the line between appreciating something and letting it rule your life.

thief

A modern fable and political satire on the Thatcher years in Britain set at Le Hollandais, a gourmet restaurant. The wife of a barbaric crime boss engages in a secretive romance with a gentle bookseller between meals at her husband’s restaurant, all observed by the cook. This nightly display of opulence, decadence and gluttony leads to murder, torture and revenge.

monkies-eating

The use of heat and utensils to process food may be more than a by-product of human evolution. According to theories presented in this program, cooking began much earlier than previously thought and ignited a series of changes that shaped our physical and mental abilities.

ChristmasInConnecticut

A famous food writer lies about living on a farm, raising her children and being a good cook. In reality she is an unmarried New Yorker who can’t boil an egg. When her editor says she will spend Christmas with a heroic sailor, her job is on the line.

bad_taste

The Evil Lord Crumb and his alien goon-squad have descended upon the planet Earth in order to reap a fresh supply of human flesh, a new taste treat for their intergalactic fast-food chain. How can we earthlings be saved from this cannabalistic doom? Fear not, for the Alien Investigation and Defense Service will defend us to within a shred of their mortal existence.

Cheers-TV-Series

The regulars of the Boston bar Cheers share their experiences and lives with each other while drinking or working at the bar where everybody knows your name.



Share Your Story: A Call for South Florida Veterans and Military Families

storycorps-blog_logoThe search for South Florida soldiers and their family members is actively underway by StoryCorps, Warmamas, and the University of Miami Libraries (UML). The three organizations are collaborating on StoryCorps’ Military Voices Initiative, a project that honors veterans and the military community by recording and preserving their stories. Approximately eighteen interviews will begin at 9 a.m. on March 11, 12, and 13 at the Otto G. Richter Library on UM’s Coral Gables campus.

StoryCorps interviews are conducted as a conversation between two people, while a trained StoryCorps facilitator guides the 40-minute recording session. With the participants’ permission, the recordings of these interviews will be archived at the Library of Congress and segments of select interviews may also air nationally on NPR’s Morning Edition. “We are a people defined by small acts of courage, kindness and heroism,” says StoryCorps founder David Isay. The Military Voices Initiative builds on this notion and contributes to StoryCorps’ diverse collection by recording and preserving the stories of veterans and military families. It is an opportunity for them to share their experiences in their own words.

The archive of recorded oral histories will be preserved at UML’s Special Collections, located at the Otto G. Richter Library. Open to the public, Special Collections houses a vast repository for researchers on a wide range of topics, with a particular emphasis on South Florida and the Caribbean. “As a community archive, Special Collections actively documents history by collecting materials, from photographs to personal letters to video recordings, that will remain here permanently and ultimately serve to inform, enlighten, and even inspire future generations,” says Chuck Eckman, Dean of University of Miami Libraries.

StoryCorps previously partnered with UML on Historias, an initiative to record the diverse stories and life experiences of Latinos in the United States. UML’s Cuban Heritage Collection served as a community partner for Historias interviews conducted locally in 2009. Additional UML oral history projects include the Haitian Diaspora Oral History Collections at Special Collections and multiple oral history projects focusing on Cuban diaspora and Cuban American communities at the Cuban Heritage Collection. Access to oral history collections is available from UML’s website.

Veterans and military families interested in this opportunity to tell their story should call Patricia Sowers at 786-493-0892, 305-461-5193, or email pfsowers@bellsouth.net.

Members of the press may interview selected participants as well as StoryCorps, UML, and Warmamas staff at 9 a.m. on March 13. Press must contact Barbara Gutierrez at bgutierrez@miami.edu to RSVP.