CHC Research Colloquia 2017-2018: Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellows Speak on their Research

The Cuban Heritage Collection’s 2017-2018 Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowship Research Colloquia kicks off in August with several talks by researchers who will be describing their works in progress.

​Colloquia are scheduled for 3 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Held at the Elena Díaz-Versón Amos Conference Room in the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion on second floor of the Otto G. Richter Library, these events are free and open to the public.

  • Tuesday, August 1
  • John Ermer, Florida International University (History)
    The Lebanese Mahjar in Cuba
  • Asiel Sepulveda, Southern Methodist University (Art History)
    City Impressions: Frédéric Mialhe and the Making of Nineteenth-Century Havana
  • Thursday, August 3
  • Lilianne Lugo Herrera, University of Miami (Modern Languages and Literatures)
    Transnational Black Bodies: Caribbean Perspectives on the Theater of the Cuban Diaspora
  • Thursday, August 10
  • Rodrigo Del Rio, Harvard University (Romance Languages and Literatures)
    Cuban Urban Imaginaries: Writing the City on the Verge of Revolution
  • Tuesday, August 15
  • Alberto Sosa Cabanas, Florida International University (Modern Languages)
    Racism, Celebration and Otherness: Depictions of Blackness in the Cuban Cultural Discourse (1790-1959)
  • Tuesday, August 22
  • Catherine Mas, Yale University (History, Program in the History of Science and Medicine)
    The Culture Brokers: Medicine, Anthropology, and Transcultural Miami, 1960-1990

Learn more about the Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowships »



Miami Zine Fair 2017

Did you know that Special Collections at the University of Miami Libraries has one of the largest zine collections in the country? From the incendiary writings of a 1770s revolutionary pamphleteer like Thomas Paine to the thoughtful and humorous works of current and former UM students, our zine collections cover just about any topic you can imagine…and they’re available for you to read, study, and spark inspiration! Best of all, Special Collections is open to the public. Want to study zine history? Interested in zines about flappers, science fiction, fashion, gender, sexuality, anarchy, punk rock, and culinary history? Our collections cover these topics and so much more.

Cover of Scam #7, by author Erick Lyle, also known as “Iggy Scam.”

Stop by and see us at the Miami Zine Fair at the Lowe Art Museum this Saturday, April 22, for a sample of our collections. Also, make sure to visit us on the eighth floor of the Otto G. Richter Library any weekday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to start your zine-ventures!



Join Us for Mindfulness at Richter on March 29, 4:30 p.m.

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Wednesday, March 29
4:30 – 5 p.m.

Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL 33146

Co-presented by the UM School of Law

Join us for a practice session in mindfulness led by Scott Rogers, Lecturer in Law and Director of the Mindfulness in Law Program. This 30-minute session will introduce the fundamentals in mindfulness with five minutes of gathering and readying for practice, a 15-minute lightly-guided practice, and five-minute period of quiet discussion.

This free program is open to UM faculty, staff, students, and friends.

Parking is available at the Pavia Garage near Stanford Drive. Please click map image below to enlarge. Learn more about parking »

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Join CHC Fellow Jennifer Lambe at Books & Books on March 31

March 31, 2017 | 8 p.m.
Books & Books | 265 Aragon Ave, Coral Gables, FL

On the outskirts of Havana lies Mazorra, an asylum known to-and at times feared by-ordinary Cubans for over a century. Since its founding in 1857, the island’s first psychiatric hospital has been an object of persistent political attention. Drawing on hospital documents and government records, as well as the popular press, photographs, and oral histories, Dr. Jennifer L. Lambe charts the connections between the inner workings of this notorious institution and the highest echelons of Cuban politics. Across the sweep of modern Cuban history, she finds, Mazorra has served as both laboratory and microcosm of the Cuban state: the asylum is an icon of its ignominious colonial and neocolonial past and a crucible of its republican and revolutionary futures.

About the Author
Dr. Jennifer L. Lambe is Assistant Professor of Latin American and Caribbean History at Brown University. A 2011 Cuban Heritage Collection Research Fellow, she earned her Ph.D. in Latin American and Caribbean History at Yale University and her B.A. in Gender Studies and History at Brown University. Her work has received support from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Coordinating Council for Women in History, and the Cuban Heritage Collection of the University of Miami Libraries. Dr. Lambe is coeditor of the volume New Histories of the Cuban Revolution, currently under review by Duke University Press.

This event is free and open to the public. Download a PDF flyer.

To RSVP or find out more, please call 305-348-1991 or email cri@fiu.edu.

Co-sponsored by the University of Miami Cuban Heritage Collection, Amigos of the Cuban Heritage Collection, FIU Steven J. Green School of International & Public Affairs, and Books & Books





Goizueta Fellows: In Their Own Words

Throughout the 2016-2017 academic year the Cuban Heritage Collection is welcoming ten emerging scholars into the Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowships Program. We are proud to introduce each of our 2016-2017 Goizueta Fellows throughout the course of the program.
Our sixth fellow of the series, Samuel Finesurrey, will discuss his work in a CHC Research Colloquium on Wednesday, November 2, 3 p.m., at CHC’s Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion. All are welcome to attend this presentation.

About Samuel Finesurrey

Goizueta Fellow Samuel Finesurrey

Goizueta Fellow Samuel Finesurrey is pursuing his Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

New Jersey native Samuel Finesurrey has always loved history. He attended University of Wisconsin as an undergrad and previously worked as a high school teaching Intern in New York City.

What university/program are you from?

I’m a Ph.D. student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

What are you working on?

My dissertation is on Cuba’s Anglo-American Colony during the 1950s.

What do you expect to find at CHC?

The CHC is home to wonderful collections of Anglo-American-run cultural institutions, Anglo-American-managed corporations, and donations from members of the Anglo-American community.

How can we learn more about your research?

I will be talking about my project in a CHC Research Colloquium* on November 2, 3 p.m., at the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion. You can contact me at finesurrey@gmail.com.

*Colloquia are free and open to the public. Contact us at chc@miami.edu for more information.



UM Libraries Events: Fall 2016

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Mark your calendar for a series of stimulating book talks, discussions, and presentations coming up at UM Libraries. 

Stay on top of the Libraries’ latest news, resources, and services. Receive electronic invitations to special events, talks and presentations, exhibitions, workshops, and more.



Donor Stories: Rotary Club Miami-Granada

The Rotary Club Miami-Granada recently donated a series of documents dating to 1916, when the historic Havana Chapter of Rotary International (RI), from which the club originates, was established. The Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) recognized the Miami-Granada club’s donation at a June 30 event at the CHC’s Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion.

The Havana Rotary Club was the “first RI chapter established outside of the United States in a Spanish-speaking country,” explained the chapter’s president, Dr. Réne López-Guerrero.

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Ellen Blasi, a former District Governor of Rotary International, introduces Dr. Réne López-Guerrero, president of the Rotary Club Miami-Granada at the club’s centennial anniversary event on June 30 at the CHC.

From its inception, the club’s list of achievements grew exponentially, providing RI with four directors and sponsoring the foundation of 43 other Cuban clubs. After a 25-year hiatus precipitated by the 1959 Cuban revolution, the Havana Rotary Club was reborn in 1985 in Miami, Florida, as the Rotary Club Miami-Granada to continue its legacy of “Rotary Serving Humanity.”

In a letter read during the event, U.S. Senator Marco Rubio recognized the important collaboration of the CHC and Rotary Club Miami-Granada. “I am humbled to learn of the many accomplishments the Rotary Club Miami-Granada has made of service to others in their communities,” Sen. Rubio writes. “As the son of Cuban parents I share with you a sense of pride and joy during this meaningful event as you share with others a rich and plentiful history.”

The documents are now available in the Rotary Club of Miami-Granada Collection, 1916-1985, for the permanent use of scholars and researchers.  Material will be added to the collection on an on-going basis.



Goizueta Fellows: In Their Own Words

Throughout the 2016-2017 academic year the Cuban Heritage Collection is welcoming ten emerging scholars into the Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowships Program. We are proud to introduce each of our 2016-2017 Goizueta Fellows throughout the course of the program.
Our fifth fellow of the series, Vida Owusu-Boateng, will discuss her work in a CHC Research Colloquium on Monday, August 15, 3 p.m., at CHC’s Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion. All are welcome to attend this presentation.

About Vida Owusu-Boateng

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Goizueta Fellow Vida Owusu-Boateng is pursuing her Ph.D. in comparative literature at Louisiana State University.

Vida Owusu-Boateng is a second year Ph.D. student at Louisiana State University concentrating in comparative literature.

What university/program are you from?

The Comparative Literature Program at Louisiana State University

What are you working on?

My research focuses on the reception of ancient Greek tragedy in Africa and the African diaspora, specifically in Cuba and South Africa. As part of my preliminary research for my dissertation prospectus, I focus on the dramatic and critical outputs of two Cuban playwrights: Virgilio Piñera’s Electra Garrigó (1941) and José Triana’s Medea en el Espejo (1960), and their performance history in Cuba, Miami, and the Caribbean world. These works are important for exploring the political, historical, and cultural situation of Cuba and the Caribbean at large. Piñera’s experimental drama, Electra Garrigó, is one of the earliest receptions of ancient tragedy in the Caribbean as a whole and it is widely regarded as marking the beginning of Cuba’s theatrical modernism and the avant-garde and absurdist theater in the Caribbean. These authors cubanize and revolutionize Greek tragedy and its reception in both Cuba and the Cuban diaspora by situating these Greek myths in a Cuban imaginary to interrogate present political, cultural, historical, and social issues. By cubanizing these myths, Triana and Piñera establish a connection between the oral traditions of ancient Greece and the hybrid transculturation and diasporic nature of Cuban culture and society.
I am particularly interested in the historical and cultural context that influenced these artists and playwrights and their artistic choices towards these ancient works. Specifically, my research focuses on how the plays by Piñera and Triana have created an economics of cultural exchange, of loss and gain of identity, negotiated over a considerable period of time between Cuba, Africa and the West. These Cuban examples offer a valuable insight into the potential of —and especially the limits of—Classical dramas to address fraught political and social realities in the modern world.

What do you expect to find at CHC?

During my visit to the Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC), I hope to consult a wide array of materials about the literary and artistic scene in Cuba and other Cuban diaspora locales from the 1940s through the 1970s, an era that envelopes the development of Cuba’s modernist theater. Miami and other Cuban diasporic locales represent important Cuban diasporic locations where plays will be staged regularly with numerous alterations to interrogate issues of exile, identity, race, homeland, and nation. Studying these works will open up important insights and counterpoints to the construction of Cuban identities through time and space in and beyond Cuba and thus broaden the reception history of these works.

How can we learn more about your research?

I will be talking about my project in a CHC Research Colloquium* on August 15, 3 p.m., at the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion. Additionally this study will culminate in a monograph and hopefully I will publish some of my findings as articles in research journals.

*Colloquia are free and open to the public. Contact us at chc@miami.edu for more information.