DVD Picks: Thanksgiving on TV

by Terri Robar, Learning & Research Services

You probably know that our DVD collection has movies but did you realize that we also have television shows? To help you get into the holiday mood, we’ve chosen some favorite Thanksgiving episodes from these series. Happy Turkey Day!

The following TV series are a part of Richter Library’s DVD collection. In addition to the thousands of DVDs spanning comedy, drama, sci-fi, horror, documentary, and other genres, UM Libraries also houses film-related materials such as screenplays, soundtracks, musical scores, and original book titles. Search the catalog to browse music and print resources related to these films.

Buffy Cover

Buffy Summers and the rest of the gang get a Thanksgiving surprise when the spirit of a Native American warrior returns to the land of the living.

On Thanksgiving, Bart gets into a fight with the family and runs away from home before sharing a turkey dinner with a group of homeless people at a soup kitchen and learning the true meaning of the holiday in the process.

Diane is one of the few graduate students selected to spend Thanksgiving with her professor and his family in the “Pilgrim tradition.”

Dozens of Chinese stowaways are discovered in a container ship in California; Toby looks to pick a fight over school prayer with a recess appointment; Thanksgiving at the White House sees C.J. in charge of turkeys and Charlie looking for the ultimate carving knife.

Frasier, Martin, and Niles fly to Boston for Thanksgiving. Frasier and Lilith go together for an interview with the principal of an exclusive boarding school, hoping to gain a spot for Frederick. They are so dogged that the principal agrees to admit Frederick if they both promise that he’ll never lay eyes on either of them again.

It’s Thanksgiving in a few days but the family nature of the holidays will be difficult for many to achieve. Don refuses to join Betty and the children with her family for the holidays, he balking at the notion of the long drive and short time to spend there.

The Conner family steps it up for this Thanksgiving episode after Roseanne wins the lottery. Roseanne and Jackie’s mother, Bev, is outraged at the idea of a gay couple adopting children and, in the middle of a dinnertime diatribe, accidentally outs her own attraction to women.

What do a pack of genetically-modified murderous turkeys, a Braveheart parody, Sally Struthers, and a starving Ethiopian child have in common? They’re all part of this deliciously wicked Thanksgiving episode, which became an instant classic for the subversive series.

The gang relives their worst Thanksgivings, including Joey getting a turkey stuck on his head, Chandler’s parents getting divorced, and Monica accidentally cutting off Chandler’s toe. It all ends with Monica with a turkey on her head, with sunglasses and a fez, shimmying.

Carol Hathaway faces an ethical dilemma when a patient admits that he, and not his friend, was driving the car that ran a red light and killed a pedestrian. It’s Thanksgiving and the doctors treat an animal rights activist who was attacked by the turkey he was trying to save. Doug Ross is going to the Bahamas with Linda Farrell and he is very much feeling like a kept man. Carter has to treat a transgender woman who has now reached an age where she can no longer pass as a woman.

Rita prepares a big Thanksgiving meal while Dexter and Debra conduct investigations. Dexter stops by Arthur’s house for a visit and realizes that though Arthur is in appearance the happy family man, he is in fact terrorizing his family. According to Arthur’s son Jonah, they are all regularly beaten. Jonah is afraid to confront his father and invites Dexter for Thanksgiving dinner.

House and the team take on the case of James Sidas, an exceptionally brilliant physicist and author who traded his successful career for a job as a courier. For the ailing patient, intelligence is a miserable burden that has prompted depression and addiction, and this, coupled with his myriad unusual symptoms, nearly stumps the team. Meanwhile, the doctors at Princeton Plainsboro wrestle with strained personal relationships on the eve of Thanksgiving.

Join Us for a Conversation with María Martínez-Cañas and J. Tomás López


“La Quinta Columna Te Espía” in Quince Sellos Cubanos.

University of Miami Cuban Heritage Collection will present a conversation with María Martínez-Cañas, artist of Quince Sellos Cubanos, and J. Tomás López, professor of Art and Art History, at the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion on Thursday, November 19, 2015, at 6:30 p.m.

Martínez-Cañas reimagined iconic images from the Cuban stamp collection she’s had since childhood. A limited-edition series of her renowned portfolio, Quince Sellos Cubanos, is now on view at Richter Library. The exhibition features 15 gelatin silver prints alongside the original Cuban stamps that inspired her work.

Martínez-Cañas will discuss her work with Professor López, who is also head of the Electronic Media and Photography area at UM. As a photographer, Professor López’s prints are part of several major collections, including those of the Smithsonian Institution, the National Gallery of American Arts, and the International Museum of Photography.

Please join us for a reception and conversation with María Martínez-Cañas and J. Tomás López on her work and exploration of history, memory, and identity.

The exhibition will run through December 2015.

This event is free and open to the public.

RSVP to Ivett Uria at 305-284-4026 or richterevents@miami.edu.

Please click map image below to enlarge. Contact us at 305-284-4026 or richterevents@miami.edu with questions about directions and parking.8608e468-9c3c-47d6-aaa6-cc3685281391


Join the Writing Center’s Mini Classics Book Club


Join in the discussion every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Richter Library.

The Writing Center’s Mini Classics Book Club meets each Tuesday evening at Richter Library (room 225) from 6:30 to 7:30. The newly formed club is a wonderful opportunity to expand your literary horizons with classic works of around 100 pages.

The club is now reading The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway. Released in 1952, this 127-page book is Hemingway’s most popular work, about an aging Cuban fisherman, alone in a small skiff, who catches a magnificent marlin and must defy the sea, marauding sharks, and his own flagging strength to bring his great catch home.

Whether you have started the book, finished the book or are just interested in the book, you are more than welcome to join. For questions or to find out more, please contact UM librarian Ava Brillat at abrillat@miami.edu.