Join Us for Mindfulness at Richter on August 31, 4 p.m.

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Wednesday, August 31
4 – 4:30 p.m.

Otto G. Richter Library 
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL 33146

Co-presented by the UM School of Law

Join us for a practice session in mindfulness led by Scott Rogers, Lecturer in Law and Director of the Mindfulness in Law Program. This 30-minute session will introduce the fundamentals in mindfulness with five minutes of gathering and readying for practice, a 15-minute lightly-guided practice, and five-minute period of quiet discussion.

This free program is open to UM faculty, staff, and students. If you’re interested in attending, please send an email to richterevents@miami.edu.

Stay tuned for the next two dates in this series:

  • Wednesday, September 28
  • Wednesday, October 26

Parking is available at the Pavia Garage near Stanford Drive. Please click map image below to enlarge. Learn more about parking »

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Student Co-Curated Exhibition Explores Orange Bowl Festival History

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Design for a Busch Gardens Orange Bowl Parade entry, 1970. Orange Bowl Committee Archives, University of Miami Special Collections.

by Sarah Block, Library Communications

For many ’Cane fans, Miami Orange Bowl nostalgia comes with the territory of football season. But this year is special—marking ten years since the team kicked off their final season at the original home field. With the help of the archives, two UM undergraduate students have been gearing up for the anniversary.

Over the course of ten months, Andrew Wodrich, ’17, and Francesca Ciuffo, ’19, conducted research using the rarely seen records of the Orange Bowl Committee held by the University of Miami Special Collections. Their efforts have culminated in the first public display of the organization’s papers, titled Miami Celebrates: The Orange Bowl Festival, 1930s-1990s.

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Miami Celebrates: The Orange Bowl Festival, 1930s-1990s marks the first public display of the Orange Bowl Committee Papers.

Now on view on the first floor of the Otto G. Richter Library, the exhibition features original photographs, letters, and memorabilia, among other materials, donated to the University in 2012, highlighting six decades of Orange Bowl Festival events and many memorable moments at the iconic stadium.

The students co-curated the exhibition under the mentorship of UM librarians as part of the new Library Research Scholars Program, which promotes student engagement with the University of Miami Libraries’ research collections and service programs.

Aerial view of the Miami Orange Bowl, 1964. From the University of Miami Historical Photograph Collection, University Archives.

Aerial view of the Miami Orange Bowl, 1964. From the University of Miami Historical Photograph Collection, University Archives.

“I was really interested in researching Coral Gables and Miami history, and that led me to the work of the Orange Bowl Committee,” explains Wodrich, a neuroscience and history major from Michigan. “Immediately I became fascinated by the story of people, so many decades ago, working together to create something out of nothing.”

Wodrich and Ciuffo’s discoveries actually date back to even before the founding of the Orange Bowl Festival (which continues today as the Capital One Orange Bowl). One featured poster advertises the precursor bowl known as the Festival of Palms, held on New Year’s Day, 1932. The Hurricanes faced Manhattan College at downtown Miami’s Moore Park, winning 7-0. “It was an idea to attract tourists for the holidays, which the city desperately needed, economically speaking,” Wodrich says.

That game, they explain, set the stage for the Orange Bowl—its annual match-ups as well as the surrounding festivities. Burdine Stadium, later named the Miami Orange Bowl (and today’s site of Marlins Park) opened in 1937, just five years following the Palm Festival. But the elaborate pageantry, flamboyant parades, and slough of events now iconic to the Orange Bowl brand spread out far beyond the stadium walls.

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Francesca Ciuffo, who co-curated the exhibition as a freshman, discusses her work at an April reception celebrating the inaugural class of Library Research Scholars.

The parade is a prominent exhibition highlight, with large-scale illustrations of original float designs over its walls showing off a substantial creative investment matched by a variety of corporate sponsorships, from Busch Gardens to Eastern Airlines, Barnett Bank, and Coppertone. “It was a major undertaking. Earnie Seiler, today considered the ‘father of the Orange Bowl,’ selected the participants and established the lineup,” Ciuffo explains.

“The festival just took over the city,” says Ciuffo, a public relations and broadcast journalism major from New York. “People from all over the country and world were suddenly coming in droves for the attractions. There were tennis tournaments at Flamingo and Salvadore Parks, a regatta that started at the Pelican Harbor Marina, and of course there was the parade, which was held on Biscayne Boulevard.”

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“There is a strong UM tie throughout the history of the Orange Bowl that we really wanted to come through,” says exhibition co-curator Andrew Wodrich, ’17.

The final parade, held in 2001, capped off a 66-year tradition that still shines in the legacy of Seiler, who as City of Miami’s director is remembered as a creative and technical driving force in all areas of the festival. “He was a local football coach who just through persistence got this thing off the ground,” Wodrich says. “Originally he was out there on the street just waving down cars to get people to fill the stands.”

The exhibition additionally highlights some of the original members of the Orange Bowl Committee, including UM trustees Oscar E. Dooly and Arthur A. Unger, which Wodrich points out as a meaningful connection. “There is a strong UM tie throughout the history of the Orange Bowl that we really wanted to come through.”

Miami Celebrates: The Orange Bowl Festival, 1930s-1990s is on view through December 2016. The exhibition is sponsored by the Lynda and Michael Gordon Exhibition Program.

Photos by Brittney Bomnin.



Goizueta Fellows: In Their Own Words

Throughout the 2016-2017 academic year the Cuban Heritage Collection is welcoming ten emerging scholars into the Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowships Program. We are proud to introduce each of our 2016-2017 Goizueta Fellows throughout the course of the program.
Our fifth fellow of the series, Vida Owusu-Boateng, will discuss her work in a CHC Research Colloquium on Monday, August 15, 3 p.m., at CHC’s Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion. All are welcome to attend this presentation.

About Vida Owusu-Boateng

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Goizueta Fellow Vida Owusu-Boateng is pursuing her Ph.D. in comparative literature at Louisiana State University.

Vida Owusu-Boateng is a second year Ph.D. student at Louisiana State University concentrating in comparative literature.

What university/program are you from?

The Comparative Literature Program at Louisiana State University

What are you working on?

My research focuses on the reception of ancient Greek tragedy in Africa and the African diaspora, specifically in Cuba and South Africa. As part of my preliminary research for my dissertation prospectus, I focus on the dramatic and critical outputs of two Cuban playwrights: Virgilio Piñera’s Electra Garrigó (1941) and José Triana’s Medea en el Espejo (1960), and their performance history in Cuba, Miami, and the Caribbean world. These works are important for exploring the political, historical, and cultural situation of Cuba and the Caribbean at large. Piñera’s experimental drama, Electra Garrigó, is one of the earliest receptions of ancient tragedy in the Caribbean as a whole and it is widely regarded as marking the beginning of Cuba’s theatrical modernism and the avant-garde and absurdist theater in the Caribbean. These authors cubanize and revolutionize Greek tragedy and its reception in both Cuba and the Cuban diaspora by situating these Greek myths in a Cuban imaginary to interrogate present political, cultural, historical, and social issues. By cubanizing these myths, Triana and Piñera establish a connection between the oral traditions of ancient Greece and the hybrid transculturation and diasporic nature of Cuban culture and society.
I am particularly interested in the historical and cultural context that influenced these artists and playwrights and their artistic choices towards these ancient works. Specifically, my research focuses on how the plays by Piñera and Triana have created an economics of cultural exchange, of loss and gain of identity, negotiated over a considerable period of time between Cuba, Africa and the West. These Cuban examples offer a valuable insight into the potential of —and especially the limits of—Classical dramas to address fraught political and social realities in the modern world.

What do you expect to find at CHC?

During my visit to the Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC), I hope to consult a wide array of materials about the literary and artistic scene in Cuba and other Cuban diaspora locales from the 1940s through the 1970s, an era that envelopes the development of Cuba’s modernist theater. Miami and other Cuban diasporic locales represent important Cuban diasporic locations where plays will be staged regularly with numerous alterations to interrogate issues of exile, identity, race, homeland, and nation. Studying these works will open up important insights and counterpoints to the construction of Cuban identities through time and space in and beyond Cuba and thus broaden the reception history of these works.

How can we learn more about your research?

I will be talking about my project in a CHC Research Colloquium* on August 15, 3 p.m., at the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion. Additionally this study will culminate in a monograph and hopefully I will publish some of my findings as articles in research journals.

*Colloquia are free and open to the public. Contact us at chc@miami.edu for more information.



Goizueta Fellows: In Their Own Words

Throughout the 2016-2017 academic year the Cuban Heritage Collection is welcoming ten emerging scholars into the Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowships Program. We are proud to introduce each of our 2016-2017 Goizueta Fellows throughout the course of the program.

Our fourth fellow of the series, James Wilkey, will discuss his work in a CHC Research Colloquium on Thursday, August 11, 3 p.m., at CHC’s Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion. All are welcome to attend this presentation.

About James Wilkey

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Goizueta Fellow James Wilkey is pursuing his Ph.D. in Latin American history at Louisiana State University.

James Wilkey is a third year Ph.D. student at Louisiana State University, where he studies Cuban-American diasporic culture. James received his M.A. at Queen’s University Belfast in Northern Ireland and his bachelor’s degree at the University of Florida.

What university/program are you from?

The Department of Latin American History at Louisiana State University

What are you working on?

I’m exploring the relationship between the early decades of the Cuban and Mexican film industries. Specifically, I’m looking at Mexico’s prominent role in establishing a Spanish-language industry aimed at Latin America broadly and how that industry impacted, and was impacted by, Cubans. I’m also interested in determining what role this connections had, if any, in Cuban movement to Mexico.

What do you expect to find at CHC?

I hope to find periodicals and papers related to the industry that will help me better understand the way Cubans imagined Mexico through its prominent presence in Latin American pop culture. I hope to encounter correspondence or other evidence clarifying the extent to which Mexican and Cuban filmmakers encountered, worked with, and influenced each other. I’m also curious to see how concepts of “Nuestra America” and the idea of an interconnected Latin America, coupled with competition from Hollywood, impacted the images of Latin America that Cuban and Mexican filmmakers put on screen.

How can we learn more about your research?

I will be talking about my project in a CHC Research Colloquium* on August 11, 3 p.m., at the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion. I invite anyone interested in learning more about my research to contact me through my email: jwilk33@lsu.edu.

*Colloquia are free and open to the public. Contact us at chc@miami.edu for more information.

About the Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowships Program

The Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowships Program provides assistance to doctoral students who wish to use the research resources available in the University of Miami Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) in support of dissertation research. The goal of these fellowships is to engage emerging scholars with the materials available in the Cuban Heritage Collection and thus contribute to the larger body of scholarship in Cuban, hemispheric, and international studies.

For more information about fellowship opportunities to study at the Cuban Heritage Collection or to learn about past fellows, click here.



Florida Menu Collection: A New Taste of Florida History

By Yvette Yurubi, Reference Assistant, Special Collections

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The Buccaneer Lodge in Marathon, Florida, was a famous resort in the Florida Keys. This menu highlights some of the local seafood dishes.

There is much to be learned about a region’s culture and economy through looking at something as commonplace as a simple restaurant menu. Some of the world’s oldest menus trace back to clay tablets written by the Sumerians who devoted time to listing out foods that they would serve their gods. Since then, menus have become a daily part of our lives, so much so that they tend to go unnoticed beyond their utilitarian purposes. But they also have an important use in libraries and archives, shedding light on moments in time and highlighting changes in the world at large.

In a general sense, menus provide a very graphic and immediate window into the way economy, class, and cuisine affect one another. If you ever want to know where the upper echelons of any society chose to dine or what cuisine they revered as their finest, there is no better source than menus. Hotel and cruise menus, in particular, capture the cultural conscience in terms of what can be classified as luxury and exotic dining while menus for local eateries capture what the working class and less affluent chose to eat on a daily basis. Furthermore, they depict how the nation’s fluctuating GDP and increase or limits in global trade affected the prices of common, regional dishes and foreign dishes over time, showing the delicate interplay between supply and demand.

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Left: A mid-century menu from the Fleur de Lis Room, an iconic restaurant located inside the Fontainebleau Hotel on Miami Beach which hosted performances by Elvis and Frank Sinatra. Right: Menu cover from Little Havana’s China City, today known as Oriental Restaurant.

Florida’s menus, in particular, exhibit the rich history of the many diasporas that make up the state’s diverse population and a growing maritime and agricultural economy as new businesses started to emerge throughout the 1900s. The previous uninhabited swamp lands of Florida were purchased by visionaries like George E. Merrick, founder of Coral Gables, who sought to turn these lands into profit, thus aiding Florida in becoming an agricultural center that quickly expanded and prospered over time. As Florida’s land grew more attractive to other business moguls due to the year-round warm temperatures, its prime fishing locations, and its beautiful beaches, the hospitality industry also flourished.

In the 1960s and the decades that followed, mass diaspora from the Caribbean islands contributed to a dramatic cultural shift that had also affected the local cuisine, particularly in South Florida. Spanish and Caribbean food were rapidly becoming a staple there, introducing native Floridians and vacationers to a new array of dishes and flavors that would eventually expand internationally over time. These trends could be observed in the way traditional American dishes were being replaced by a growing obsession among food enthusiasts in fusion cuisine. The onset of the new millennium also brought about more awareness to health issues and lifestyle choices, paving the way for gluten-free, low-fat, and vegetarian dishes becoming ubiquitous among modern restaurant menus.

As part of our initiative to document Florida’s unique and evolving cultural history, we have been collecting menus from all over Florida and adding them our new Florida Menu Collection. We invite you now to come bring us all the menus you happen to find while dining out or strewn among your old belongings and to donate them to the University of Miami Special Collections department here on the 8th Floor of the Otto G. Richter Library.

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This Miami Beach eatery was also popular in the 1950s.