Join Us for Mindfulness at Richter on April 26, 4:30 p.m.

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Wednesday, April 26
4:30 – 5 p.m.

Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive | Coral Gables, FL 33146

Co-presented by the UM School of Law

Join us for a practice session in mindfulness led by Scott Rogers, Lecturer in Law and Director of the Mindfulness in Law Program. This 30-minute session will introduce the fundamentals in mindfulness with five minutes of gathering and readying for practice, a 15-minute lightly-guided practice, and five-minute period of quiet discussion.

This free program is open to UM faculty, staff, students, and friends.


Parking is available at the Pavia Garage near Stanford Drive. Please click map image below to enlarge. Learn more about parking »

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Miami Zine Fair 2017

Did you know that Special Collections at the University of Miami Libraries has one of the largest zine collections in the country? From the incendiary writings of a 1770s revolutionary pamphleteer like Thomas Paine to the thoughtful and humorous works of current and former UM students, our zine collections cover just about any topic you can imagine…and they’re available for you to read, study, and spark inspiration! Best of all, Special Collections is open to the public. Want to study zine history? Interested in zines about flappers, science fiction, fashion, gender, sexuality, anarchy, punk rock, and culinary history? Our collections cover these topics and so much more.

Cover of Scam #7, by author Erick Lyle, also known as “Iggy Scam.”

Stop by and see us at the Miami Zine Fair at the Lowe Art Museum this Saturday, April 22, for a sample of our collections. Also, make sure to visit us on the eighth floor of the Otto G. Richter Library any weekday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to start your zine-ventures!



DVD Picks: March for Science

by Terri Robar and James Wargacki, Learning & Research Services

April 22 is best known as Earth Day, but it is also the day of the March for Science, an international movement led by organizers around the globe. The march’s organizers are people who value science and recognize how science serves everyone. Learn more here: www.marchforscience.com

These films were selected from our DVD collection to remind us that science can be useful, important, and fun.

The original PBS series where Carl Sagan taught everyone that science is interesting and understandable. Covering everything from the origins of life to the exploration of space, Sagan awakened a generation to the wonders of science.

After a bad storm blows across Mars, astronaut Mark Watney is presumed dead and left behind. Now stuck on a hostile planet, he must find a way to signal Earth and in the meantime survive on limited supplies. Join him as he follows his plan to “science the sh*t out of this.”

This film follows the treacherous voyage of five scientists who are reduced to microscopic size and injected into the bloodstream of an injured Czechoslovak scientist to remove a cerebral blood clot which must be repaired from inside the brain.

The untold story of the “human computers,” a team of female African-American mathematicians that helped launch John Glenn into orbit at the start of the space program in the United States.

Based on a true story of two parents, the Odones research and challenge doctors to develop a cure for their son, who suffers from a rare degenerative disease.

On a remote island, a wealthy entrepreneur secretly creates a theme park featuring living dinosaurs drawn from prehistoric DNA.

In the Antarctic, the quest begins to find the perfect mate and start a family. This courtship will begin with a long journey – a journey that will take them hundreds of miles across the continent by foot. They will endure freezing temperatures, icy winds and dangerous predators – all to find true love and raise their baby chicks safely.

Al Gore explains the facts of global warming, presents arguments that the dangers of global warning have reached the level of crisis, and addresses the efforts of certain interests to discredit the anti-global warming cause.

James Burke presents science as a detective story, illustrating the connections between events of the past and inventions of the future. Burke tracks through twelve thousand years of history for the clues that lead to eight great life-changing inventions. Like this one? We have two more in this series.

“Houston, we have a problem.” En route to the moon, an oxygen fuel-cell tank exploded, cutting electrical power and the astronauts’ air supply. The film shows the crew interacting with mission specialists back on earth to rig solutions as they retreat to the lunar module for a desperate return voyage to earth.

When Adams and his crew are sent to investigate the silence from a planet inhabited by scientists, they find all but two have died. Dr. Morbius and his daughter Altaira have somehow survived a hideous monster which roams the planet. Unknown to Adams, Morbius has made a discovery, and has no intention of sharing it (or his daughter!) with anyone.

A small Tennessee town gained national attention in 1925 when a biology schoolteacher was arrested for violating state law by teaching Darwin’s theory of evolution in the classroom. This film “is a slightly fictionalized account of the Scopes Monkey Trial, that galvanized legal dramas of the 1920s.”



Pop Culture Series: History of Protests/Marches in America

by Abbey Johnson and Lauren Fralinger, Learning & Research Services

The Women’s March on Washington was held on January 21, 2017 in the nation’s capital. Image credit: Liz Lemon, Flickr.

History was made on January 21, 2017, when the Women’s March on Washington became the largest protest in history as nearly three million Americans marched nationwide. Echoed and strengthened by sister marches around the world, the gatherers demonstrated on behalf of diverse and intersectional topics, encompassing women’s rights, LGBTQ rights, racial equality, immigration, and the environment.

For those of us born in the 1980s and 1990s, mass protests like these may seem unfamiliar, however they are not a new phenomenon. The Women’s March joins other current and ongoing protests, such as the Black Lives Matter movement and the protests at Standing Rock against the Dakota Access Pipeline, as an effort to give a voice to dissenters and make changes to laws and legislation that protesters view as harmful or dangerous. These movements continue a tradition of organized political protests threaded throughout the history of America.

Dr. Anna Shaw and Carrie Chapman Catt, founders of the League of Women Voters, lead an estimated 20,000 supporters in a women’s suffrage march on New York’s Fifth Avenue in 1915. Image credit: Associated Press.

Historically, organized (and sometimes not-so-organized) protests have been a successful method for American citizens to express their discontent with the state of our government and overall political situation. The history of the United States as an independent country is rooted in protest. Even before the American Revolution began, the importance of protest was recognized by early American colonists. In protest over “taxation without representation,” colonial Americans disguised themselves and dumped crates of tea into Boston Harbor in an effort to make their displeasure known to the British Parliament. Today we know this event as the Boston Tea Party. The Boston Tea Party and similar protests eventually led to the Revolutionary War and ultimately the independence of the United States, further demonstrating the power of protest to inspire significant change.

Another early example of using protest to influence the government is the woman suffrage movement that began in the mid-1800s. After decades of organizing marches and protests, women were finally able to win the right to vote. Not only does the woman suffrage movement act as another example of the capacity of protests to make a difference in legislation with the passing of the Nineteenth Amendment, it also demonstrates that the roots of the Women’s March go back over a century. Although the movement has come a long way since the 1800s, some groups are still striving to achieve equality.

More recent examples would include the many protest movements of the 1960s and 1970s, such as the Civil Rights Movement, women’s liberation movement, and anti-war protests related to the United States’ involvement in Vietnam. Not only did the actions taken by those involved in these protests allow people to let the government know they were dissatisfied, it also led to legislative changes reflecting the interests of the protesting groups, such as the passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964.

Women marching during a Women’s Liberation demonstration in Washington, D.C. in 1970. Image credit: Warren K. Leffler, Library of Congress.

In our current political climate, Americans are facing what is for some an unprecedented level of dissatisfaction with the choices made by our government. Many have decided to come together and express that discontent in hopes of addressing what they feel needs to be changed. This could be seen as a resurgence of the protests of the 1960s, or a continuation of the unfinished work of those past movements. Either way, Americans are coming together to protest now just as they have in the past.

To learn more about recent protest movements as well as the historical roots of political protests in the United States, please check out the following library resources.

 

Books

They Can’t Kill Us All

Towards the “Other America”

Selma’s Bloody Sunday

Riot, Unrest, and Protest on the Global Stage

Breach of Peace: Portraits of the 1961 Mississippi Freedom Riders

 

DVDs

Six Generations of Suffragettes: The Women’s Rights Movement

King: A Filmed Record

The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman

A Time for Justice

The Black Power Mixtape

Selma