Join Us for a Celebration of Roberto Estopiñán on May 28

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Join us in honoring the life and work of Cuban-born sculptor Roberto Estopiñán, who passed away in January at the age of 93. The evening will include readings by the poets Alina Galliano and Gastón Álvaro; remarks by Estopiñán’s nephew Victor Alberto Garrido and the art historian Alejandro Anreus; and a recognition of his widow, Carmina Benguría. The program will be followed by a screening of the documentary Artists in Exile: Roberto Estopiñán (1994, 30 minutes) by the late Cuban-American television writer and producer Ray Blanco.

From the artist’s estate per his wishes, a selection of works on paper by Roberto Estopiñán will be donated to the Cuban Museum. The Cuban Heritage Collection has received 46 of his sketchbooks, some of which will be on display.

RSVP now to richterevents@miami.edu or call 305-284-4026.

Reception sponsored by the Amigos of the Cuban Heritage Collection.



Temporary Access Procedures for Off-Site Materials

Construction-Alert200x200Research and special collections materials that are stored off-site and were unavailable during UML’s 24/7 period are now accessible on a limited basis requiring advance notice. If you plan to use these off-site materials (as indicated in the catalog) in the near future, please contact the appropriate person below who will coordinate their retrieval.

Please note that the Brockway Hall Renovation Project will only affect access to off-site materials. For materials housed on-site at our libraries and collections, regular access will apply throughout the project.

  • For questions about UML’s off-site collections, please contact Cheryl Gowing, Associate Dean, Library Information Systems & Access, at cgowing@miami.edu or 305-284-6018.
  • From the Cuban Heritage Collection, please contact Meiyolet Mendez, CHC Librarian, at meimendez@miami.edu or 305-284-5854.
  • From Special Collections, please contact Cristina Favretto, Head of Special Collections, at cfavretto@miami.edu or 305-284-3247.
  • From University Archives, please contact Koichi Tasa, University Archivist, at k.tasa@miami.edu or 305-284-8129.

For general inquiries about the Brockway Hall Renovation Project, please contact library.communications@miami.edu.

 


 

Interruption in Service for Off-Site Materials from April 20 to May 6

There will be an interruption in service for retrieving research and special collections materials stored off-site (as indicated in the catalog) from April 20 to May 6 due to the ongoing construction project.

Following this time, access to these materials will resume on a limited basis and require advance notice. Please contact the appropriate person below regarding near-future use of off-site materials. (Please note that this project will only affect access to materials that are stored off-site. For materials housed on-site at our libraries and collections, regular access will apply throughout the project.)

  • For questions about UML’s off-site collections, please contact Cheryl Gowing, Associate Dean, Library Information Systems & Access, at cgowing@miami.edu or 305-284-6018.
  • From the Cuban Heritage Collection, please contact Meiyolet Mendez, CHC Librarian, at meimendez@miami.edu or 305-284-5854.
  • From Special Collections, please contact Cristina Favretto, Head of Special Collections, at cfavretto@miami.edu or 305-284-3247.
  • From University Archives, please contact Koichi Tasa, University Archivist, at k.tasa@miami.edu or 305-284-8129.

For general inquiries about this project, please contact library.communications@miami.edu.

 


 

UML Renovation Update: Temporary Access Procedures to Off-Site Materials

The University of Miami Libraries (UML) is beginning the first phase of renovations to Brockway Hall, a historic space on the first floor of Richter Library that will serve as the new home of Special Collections and University Archives.

Starting April 2, we will be relocating materials that are currently shelved at Brockway Hall to UML’s off-site storage facility in Miami Lakes. This will result in limited access to materials stored off-site (as indicated in the catalog) from our general collections as well as those from Special Collections, University Archives, and the Cuban Heritage Collection. Further details will soon follow on temporary procedures during each project phase for requesting these materials. Stay tuned for these updates on our website.

We will also be launching a website in the coming weeks that will provide more information about the new space and include detailed updates on this project.

In the meantime, please contact us with any questions pertaining to near-future use of off-site materials. (Please note that this project will only affect access to materials that are stored off-site. For materials housed on-site at our libraries and collections, regular access will apply throughout the project.)

  • For questions about UML’s off-site collections, please contact Cheryl Gowing, Associate Dean, Library Information Systems & Access, at cgowing@miami.edu or 305-284-6018.
  • From the Cuban Heritage Collection, please contact Meiyolet Mendez, CHC Librarian, at meimendez@miami.edu or 305-284-5854.
  • From Special Collections, please contact Cristina Favretto, Head of Special Collections, at cfavretto@miami.edu or 305-284-3247.
  • From University Archives, please contact Koichi Tasa, University Archivist, at tasa@miami.edu or 305-284-8129.

For general inquiries about this project, please contact library.communications@miami.edu.

We thank you for your patience during this time, and look forward to updating you on this exciting project.





DVD Picks: Women of the British Monarchy

by Terri Robar, Education & Outreach Librarian

In honor of the birth of Her Royal Highness Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, we offer these films about queens of the United Kingdom. May the Princess’s life story be long and joyful.

The following films are a part of Richter Library’s DVD collection, which can be searched by movie theme (or topic) as well as categories such as time period, genre, or language. Visit library.miami.edu/UDVD to view the entire collection.

After the death of Princess Diana, HM Queen Elizabeth II struggles with her reaction to a sequence of events nobody could have predicted.

Henry VIII of England discards one wife, Katharine of Aragon, who has failed to produce a male heir, in favor of the young and beautiful Anne Boleyn.

The battle between Mary I, Queen of Scots and Elizabeth I, Queen of England, comes alive in this epic film. The two queens with their contrasting personalities make a dramatic counterpoint to history.

Cate Blanchett’s marvelous performance as Queen Elizabeth I. The new queen must learn to weigh her counsel carefully and ignore her private yearnings if she is to keep her crown–and her head.

For those who would like a more authoritative view of history, we suggest this 15 episode series hosted by Simon Schama. It covers the history of Great Britain from 3100 B.C. through the 20th century.

Henry VIII had six wives. If you want to get to know each and every one of them, then this series is for you. We have all four seasons which explores the personalities of each queen and shows the childhood of his two daughters, the future Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth.

Sir Walter Raleigh wants Queen Elizabeth I to give him a fleet of ships to sail and make a name for England. A young ward of the court, Beth Throgmorton, is strongly attracted to Raleigh and he returns the attraction. The queen wants Raleigh for herself.

Very few people ever gave their name to an age. Queen Victoria did just that. Her reign lasted from 1937 to 1901 and oversaw a tremendous wave of change in all walks of life. This is a lecture series reviewing everything from politics to literature.

In the sequel to Elizabeth, Queen Elizabeth I’s reign is threatened by familial betrayal and Spain’s invading army . The queen (Cate Blanchett) and her shrewd advisers must act to safeguard the lives of her people. When the dashing seafarer Walter Raleigh captures her heart, Elizabeth is forced to make her most tragic sacrifice for the good of her country.

While on an extended stay at Balmoral Castle and still in mourning over the death of her beloved Prince Albert, Queen Victoria meets Mr. Brown, a member of her household staff who thinks the time has come for her to start living a normal life. He soon gains the queen’s favor and friendship and his authority and status in the household are soon on the rise. Theirs was a friendship that scandalized a nation.

Did you know that Helen Mirren not only played Elizabeth II in The Queen but also Elizabeth I in this mini-series? The film explores the intersection of her private and public life in the latter half of her reign, offering a personal look at her allies, her enemies, and her suitors as she struggles to survive in a male-dominated world.

Chronicles the life and times of Queen Victoria from her childhood to her early rise to power and the first turbulent years of her rule. Her romantic relationship and eventual marriage to Prince Albert culminates in a royal power struggle which ultimately is the key to her happiness when she comes to the realization that he is someone she can fully trust and believe in.



Special Collections’ Food Chains Screening Opens Discussion on Farmworker Exploitation

by Sarah Block, Library Communications

Food Chains is available for checkout on DVD from Richter Library.

Click the image above to watch a video of the discussion on April 22. More photos from the event can be viewed on Facebook.

Local farmworkers demanding fair labor practices in farm fields are making meaningful changes in one of the nation’s most critically relied on but historically exploited areas of the labor force. An event at the University of Miami Special Collections on April 22 brought together UM students, faculty, and community members for a screening and discussion of the documentary Food Chains: The Revolution in America’s Fields, directed by Sanjay Rawal. The film documents the activities of a group of farmworkers in Immokalee, southwest Florida, in their fight for living wages and workers’ rights.

“Special Collections is a community resource. This is an opportunity to promote meaningful discussion about issues that are close to many South Floridians and affect farmworkers across the country,” says Beatrice Skokan, manuscripts librarian at Special Collections who organized the screening and panel discussion.

IMG_7958-webPanelists included Will Pestle, an associate professor of anthropology in the College of Arts and Sciences, Silvia Perez, farmworker leader of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, and Natali Rodriguez, national staff member of the Student/Farmworker Alliance, engaging in a discussion on the many issues in farm labor described in the documentary, which premiered at the 2014 Berlin Film Festival and is gaining national exposure on Netflix streaming. Food Chains is available for checkout at Richter Library.

Based in Immokalee, one of the nation’s largest suppliers of tomatoes, the film describes the inhumane realities of the largely undocumented migrant workers who carry out long and strenuous daily physical labor in tomato fields for meager pay. Human rights violations ranging from sexual abuse to slave labor often go unreported out of fear of retaliation or deportation.

“The hardest thing is coming to the realization of how little you mean to the people you are working for,” says Gerardo Reyes Chavez, one of the workers featured in the film who helped form the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) as a means to advocate for a better quality of life for farmworkers. One significant step of the CIW is the establishment of the Fair Food Program, which demands that large purchasers of tomatoes acknowledge their reliance on farmworkers. Participating food retailers and farms agree to pay workers one penny more per pound of tomatoes picked and eradicate abuse in the fields.

Since 2011, major corporations including Whole Foods, Fresh Market, Chipotle, and McDonald’s have signed on to the program, meaning they have agreed to buy tomatoes exclusively from Fair Food Program farms. Since its inception, the program has added $15 million to workers’ payrolls.

Following the film, panelists and audience members engaged in a discussion moderated by Will Pestle. Many questions were directed towards Silvia Perez, a leader of the CIW who appeared in the film, about current efforts of the CIW, such as the continuation of a long-fought campaign to gain the support of Publix, and the spread of their mission to other regions and types of agriculture. Click here to view the discussion.

Silvia Perez, a leader in the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, discusses the fight for fair labor standards in a panel discussion following the film. Photo by Andrew Innerarity.