Join Us for Adobe Spark Workshop at Shalala Student Center on July 28

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Thursday, July 28
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Donna E. Shalala Student Center
Senate Room | 3rd Floor
1330 Miller Drive | Coral Gables, FL 33146
*please note change in venue

Co-presented by the UM Libraries Digital Media Lab

Ben Forta, Adobe Senior Director for Education Initiatives, and Patrick Koster, Adobe Senior Customer Success Manager for the University of Miami, will be co-delivering a hands-on workshop to familiarize attendees on Adobe Spark for creating engaging visual stories delivered as web browser experiences and narrated/animated videos.

This free workshop is open to UM faculty, staff, and students. If you’re interested in attending, please send an email to richterevents@miami.edu.

Adobe + University of Miami

The University of Miami has made a significant investment in providing access across campus to Adobe Creative Cloud desktop applications like Acrobat, Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Premiere Pro, and more. These are powerful tools for PDF workflowsimage editinggraphic designpublication layout, and video editing, but come with a bit of a learning curve. The University is working with Adobe to offer training and workshops to help the UM community maximize the benefits of these tools, including year-round support for students, faculty, and staff at the University of Miami Libraries Digital Media Lab.

Newly released Adobe Spark provides next-generation Web tools to help individuals and organizations easily communicate with immediate impact and broad distribution. Come learn how to turn your ideas into social graphics, animated videos, and web stories—in minutes.

Parking is available at the Pavia Garage near Stanford Drive. Permit holders may park at any colored lot except blue and purple. Please click map image below to enlarge.

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New Project to Archive Efforts of UM’s LGBTQ+ Student Organization

By Koichi Tasa, University Archivist

tasa_headshot_largeI am currently working for the first time to archive a collection of electronic records with my colleague Laura Capell, Head of Digital Production and Electronic Archivist. The commemorable organization of focus is UM’s undergraduate LBGTQ+ group SpectrUM. We will archive messages and e-flyers documenting their organizational efforts in support of UM’s lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender, queer, and questioning community.

The collection was inspired by President Frenk’s December 2015 message on campus initiatives for inclusiveness towards LGBTQ+ students. I contacted SpectrUM to join their mailing list and have continued to save electronic records for the use of future students and researchers. We will make a decision shortly on how to provide access to the collection. For the time being, you can find more information on the collection in the finding aid.

SpectrUM's logo from their Facebook page

SpectrUM, organized in 1992, has expanded on the work of The Gay Alliance, which formed in the 1970s.

Working on this collection made me wonder about earlier gay and lesbian organizations at the University. Some historical information is available in The Miami Hurricane Archive Online. There I found an article from 1985 titled “Gay Student Seeks to Inform” by Sal O’Neill. O’Neill, who was a senior at that time, wrote about an earlier group called The Gay Alliance, formed in the early-to-mid 1970s. “The Alliance had weekly rap sessions in the Alliance’s office in the Student Union. They also sponsored regular dances at the Rathskeller which were open to the public,” he writes, also noting significant challenges– “fears of exposure and violence, and the apathy that any group must contend with”–that brought about its demise. In the 1980s, students could connect in an off-campus group called the Gay and Lesbian Youth Group, which offered “emotional support and social interaction to gay men and lesbians not available elsewhere up to the age of 25.”

The Lavender Celebration 2016 was sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs, Student Life, Toppel Career Center and Alumni Association.

The Lavender Celebration 2016 was sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs, Student Life, Toppel Career Center and Alumni Association to recognize the accomplishments of LGBTQ graduates of the U.

This was before SpectrUM, which was organized in 1992 (under the name Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Club). Its purpose is to foster pride through education, awareness, advocacy, and social events and to support all members of the LGBTQ+ community and their allies. It’s remarkable to see how far this mission has come, and we look forward to the opportunity of sharing its continuation with future students and researchers.

Stay tuned for announcements about future archival efforts. In an upcoming project in February 2017 we will work with groups such as the Black Alumni Society and United Black Students to curate a full exhibition at Richter Library on UM’s black students and faculty. The exhibition will coincide with the Black Alumni Society’s First Black Graduates Project. We look forward to collaborating with these and other campus organizations to honor their accomplishments.



UM Libraries Co-Host 2016 Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS) Conference

Librarians and archivists gathering for the 2016 Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS) conference brought their passion for rare books, old maps, pamphlets, letters, and history in many other forms to Coral Gables for a four-day discussion on bridging collections with potential users and donors across communities.

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Special Collections Librarian Jay Sylvestre leads a tour of rare materials in an “Instameet,” bringing together RBMS participants active in promoting resources through social media. Posts from this meet up can be found on Instagram using #InstaMeetUM.

More than 400 library professionals of colleges and universities nationwide came together for the nearly 60-year-old RBMS conference, hosted this year by the University of Miami Libraries and University of Florida Smathers Libraries, from June 20 to 24, on the theme of Opening Doors to Collaboration, Outreach and Diversity.

“It’s about making sure the diversity of our communities are being reflected in our collections, and finding ways to make them more accessible to all for greater enrichment and impact,” says Cristina Favretto, head of Special Collections and a 2016 conference organizer. Several of UM’s librarians participated in conference panels and workshops, held mainly at the Biltmore Hotel and additionally on the University of Miami’s Coral Gables campus.

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UM Libraries and UF Smathers Libraries hosted a reception at the Shalala Student Center on June 23.



Graphic Novels Spotlight: Kelly Sue DeConnick

by Bill Jacobs & Sean P. Ahearn, Learning & Research Services

Image Credit: HeroesCon 14 in Charlotte, North Carolina on June 22, 2014, Wikipedia

 

Kelly Sue DeConnick is a comic book author and one of the most outspoken advocates for women’s rights and equality in the superhero graphic novel community.

DeConnick has an exemplary career having written for several major publishers including Image Comics, Boom, Oni, Humaniods, Dark Horse, IDW, DC, Vertigo, and Marvel.

 In 2012 one of the most important DeConnick updates was given to the Captain Marvel title.
Carol Danvers, our hero, dropped her old title “Ms.”, and gained a new suit (cover below). No longer are any unnecessary body parts exposed; this would be the real attitude of an Air Force captain. Along with the title hero having a realist attitude about her appearance, the themes found throughout are full of powerful feminist motifs. After an accidental mishap with time travel leaves her stranded on a Japanese occupied island during WWII, Captain Marvel finds herself being rescued by an all-woman Pilot Squadron.

In the same story, DeConnick asks her readers to contemplate women’s rights by deliberately highlighting antiquated attitudes. These sentiments, unfortunately, still plague women’s rights today.

DeConnick has no fear, and has even taken on sexuality. In a quick innocuous scene a female alien ally is pulled away from the action to quickly kiss her love (image below). This panel is an example of the blunt, unapologetic attitude that has made DeConnick stand out in the graphic novel world. Moreover, it exemplifies her open and accepting attitude about sexuality. Her devoted fan base, who have named themselves the “Carol Corps,” embrace these scenes for their narrative and aesthetic as well as ideological appeal, many finding empowerment in DeConnick’s work more than any other superhero series. She has opened comics to the female demographic, enticing and drawing in new readers who otherwise may not relate to graphic novels.

The arrival of the new, liberated Captain Marvel was embraced by some, rejected by others. This only meant DeConnick had to speak more brassily. She took her political voice to the next level in 2015 with Bitch Planet, set in an off world prison for what are supposed to be the most dangerous female criminals.

Bitch Planet is a sci-fi story that is both a literal comment on the exploitation of women in prison and a figurative criticism on women in society. As the title implies, this is not for children. While it is set in a fantastic futuristic environment, the story is dark and disheartening.

Aside from her large fan-base, DeConnick’s hard work has not gone unrecognized by the establishment; she was nominated for an Eisner award (considered the Oscars of the comic world) for Pretty Deadly, a mythological western. As graphic novels progress, so will the voices within them. DeConnick is a great example of the impact these stories have on our society and how important it is for readers to be able to identify with the characters.

Tell us what you think on Twitter or Facebook. And to learn more about any of the titles listed here or more about Kelly Sue DeConnick check out the link to our sources:

  • https://imagecomics.com/creators/view/kelly-sue-deconnick
  • http://kellysue.tumblr.com/
  • http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2015/07/kelly-sue-deconnick-profile

About the Collection

UML’s Graphic Novels collection of more than 1,000 volumes includes newspaper comic strips, Japanese manga, European bande dessinee, and alternative American comics, in addition to superhero stories. Along with high-flying, wall-crawling, planet-saving scenarios, there are detectives tracking down lost library books, demon-fighting ronan, and wine tasting competitions. Many of the unusual storylines are woven into commentary on deeper issues, such as racial history, mass media, and philosophy. Some graphic novels avoid the fantastic entirely, and instead tell mystery stories, autobiography, and graphic essays.



2016 New Directions in Cuban Studies Conference

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The University of Miami Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) will host a multidisciplinary conference October 20-21, 2016, to disseminate the work of graduate students and emerging scholars and survey the current status of Cuban and Cuban American Studies.

The application period for papers and panel proposals has now closed. Please stay tuned for event registration information.

About New Directions in Cuban Studies 2016

Planning for the 2016 conference is underway with the strong support of our organizing committee. The committee is made up of the following individuals:

  • Dr. Victor Deupi, Lecturer, University of Miami School of Architecture
  • Dr. Lillian Manzor, Associate Professor and Interim Chair, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, University of Miami College of Arts and Sciences
  • Mei Méndez, Interim Esperanza Bravo de Varona Chair, University of Miami Cuban Heritage Collection
  • Dr. Martin Tsang, CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in History and Area Studies, University of Miami Libraries

The New Directions in Cuban Studies conference is free and open to the public.  Registration is required.

Conference History

The inaugural conference was held in 2014 and included the participation of 13 former CHC fellows. The event’s keynote speaker was Louis A. Pérez, Jr. Panel discussants included Ada Ferrer, New York University, José Quiroga, Emory University, Lisandro Pérez, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and María de los Angeles Torres, University of Illinois, Chicago.

The 2014 New Directions in Cuban Studies conference was made possible in part through funding from The Goizueta Foundation and the Amigos of the Cuban Heritage Collection.