Research Assistance for The Palm Beach Post

Athletic field and a stadium were part of the main features of the original proposal of the Coral Gables campus in 1925.

Athletic field and a stadium were part of the main features of the original proposal of the Coral Gables campus in 1925.

Earlier this month we provided research assistance for a reporter from The Parm Beach Post. He had already researched our digital collections and found good materials on the early history of the Miami Hurricanes and the unfulfilled football stadium on the Coral Gables campus. I was able to provide additional materials from the Historical Photograph Collection, the Campus Architecture Collection, and the Office of the President Records.

Please go to the link below to read the thorough article on the past stadiums used the Miami Hurricanes as well as their new home in the blog story below.

A visual history of Miami Hurricanes football stadiums: from the Orange Bowl to Miami Gardens



Historical images for the President’s office

Three clusters of historical images represent Medical, Coral Gables, and RSMAS campuses (left to right)

Three clusters of historical images represent Medical, Coral Gables, and RSMAS campuses (left to right)

The University Archives was delighted to provide research assistance and high-resolution images over the last summer for the Campus Planning & Development colleagues, who were asked to select iconic images of the University of Miami to decorate President Frenk’s office. Please see the three clusters of the images selected by the Office that represent the Medical Campus, Coral Gables Campus, and RSMAS Campus (left to right).

We hold more than half a million images of the University from the 1920s to late 1970s. A small portion of the collection (approximately 78,000 images) was digitized and made accessible to the public in 2010 at our website UM Historical Photo Collection for the first time. Today, you can see those historical images everywhere at several prominent places on the Gables campus as well as in many University publications.

Lots of colleagues in the university know we are good at “old” stuff, but soon we will announce a new massive collection of more recent materials from the 1980s to the early 2000s, which was donated by the University Communications in 2013. The collection contains images, videos, publications, and press clippings, which will be a tremendous help for the schools and departments to research their organizational history. Please contact us for further assistance for the new collection.



Complete Collection (1927-2015) of The Miami Hurricane Now Accessible Online

Miami Hurricane, October 26, 1962 article "The Negro at Miami"

Miami Hurricane, October 26, 1962 article “The Negro at Miami”

Before 2010 patrons could not browse or research the archived issues of The Miami Hurricane (TMH) remotely. They had to visit the library, request bulky bound volumes of THM, and flip through the stories page by page. Also, they were encouraged to use the microfilms to save the rapidly deteriorating old original issues.

It was fall 2010 Richter had 1927-2002 content (approximately 2,900 issues, 42,000 pages) professionally digitized from microfilm and offered it to the public for the first time. Since then, Richter’s Digital Production team has added new issues provided by the past editors of THM in PDF as well as scanned old issues unavailable on microfilms, such as 1934-36 and 1963 issues and added them to the database.

So, what have we missed in the 1962-63 content? The other day I was touched by the October 26, 1962, article titled “The Negro at Miami” (front page and p. 7, link below), which reports the names and some faces of the first black students as well as their experience during the first year of integration at the U. This is a great discovery for the Black Alumni Society, which has been researching our collections to identify the first 500 black graduates from the 1960s and the 1970s. Click here to read the article.

TMH is one of the most important historical resources of the University, and the digitized content has been accessed by tens of thousands of patrons monthly since 2010. We appreciate very much TMH’s past editors for archiving with us. Also, we would like to thank our colleagues at Richter in Digital Production, Metadata & Discovery Services, and Web & Emerging Technologies for making the digitized content accessible online.



Richter’s Turnstiles Have Been In Place Since November 1972

Richter Library's Nathan and Sophia Gumenick Family Lobby in 2003

Richter Library’s Nathan and Sophia Gumenick Family Lobby in 2003

Some patrons may find swiping their ‘Cane Card to enter the Richter Library is a nuisance, but the turnstiles are there to provide improved security for patrons and our collections.

A few days ago a colleague in the library asked me when they were installed in the library, so I researched our digital resources and found out that the date was November 18, 1972. Please go to the link below to read the August 26, 1974, Veritas article “Library Attendance.”

Veritas, August 26, 1974, p. 1

Also, please see the interesting internal document below, which is meeting minutes dated May 24, 1972, recommending the installation of a card-operated turnstile ASAP.

Richter's Public Service Heads  met on May 24, 1972 and made a recommendation to install a turnstile for security.

Richter’s Public Service Heads met on May 24, 1972 and made a recommendation to install a turnstile for security.