Caribbean Fragments | A Library-Wide Exhibit Complements a Special Report on the University’s Close Relationship With Its Island Neighbors

Since its founding more than 90 years ago, the University of Miami has forged deep connections with the Caribbean. Faculty, students, and alumni travel throughout the islands, learning from diverse populations, providing assistance to underserved communities, and strengthening bonds. Cuba and the Caribbean, a special report recently produced by UM News in collaboration with academic units across the University including the Libraries, highlights the U’s varied activities in the Caribbean in areas such as environmental and anthropological research, healthcare, arts and culture, policy, and business.

Complementing the publication of Cuba and the Caribbean, a major exhibition has transformed the second floor of the Otto G. Richter Library and the Cuban Heritage Collection’s Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion. Caribbean Fragments comprises a selection of historical documents, artifacts, manuscripts, and rare books from UML’s Cuban Heritage Collection, Special Collections, University Archives, and the Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library, and offers a point of departure for reflection on the research and discovery that spawn new hemispheric insights.

Caribbean Fragments was co-curated by Beatrice Skokan, curator for Caribbean Collections and interim Esperanza Bravo de Varona Chair of the CHC, and Dr. Martin Tsang, CHC librarian and curator for Latin American Collections.

Seascapes and Mindscapes

Visiting artist Leandro Soto, whose work is represented among the CHC’s holdings, has reimagined the exhibition space as a seascape—a fluid, ever-changing ocean that permeates not only the archipelago’s geography, but the imagination of its inhabitants. Inviting viewers to navigate their own experiences and emotions as they explore the objects on view, the immersive environment evokes the circulating currents of spirituality that permeate the region, the profound influence of maritime travel and migration on its evolution, and the ebbs and flows of its eternal complexities.

To view the special University report on Cuba and the Caribbean, visit cuba.miami.edu.



“Black Hair Magic” student photography exhibit, event

You are cordially invited to

Black Hair Magic

October 26, 2017 | 6 p.m.
Otto G. Richter Library, 3rd Floor Conference Room
University of Miami | 1300 Memorial Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146

Join us for a talk and reception with UM student photographer, Alexis McDonald. McDonald’s photographs aim to demonstrate the beauty of Black culture and showcase the diversity of Black hair. She began the collection in 2015 and continues to expand it, hoping these photographs will serve as a constant reminder of the uniqueness of Black culture.

Light refreshments will be served following the presentation.

Black Hair Magic is on view in the Richter Library first floor Digital Media Lab through December 2017.

Questions? Please send an email to richterevents@miami.edu or call 305-284-4026.


UM is a smoke-free campus. Parking is available at the Pavia Garage near Stanford Drive.



Now On View at Richter Library | Art + Structure: The Impact and Legacy of Denman Fink

This University Archives exhibit highlights original materials that document the life and legacy of artist, illustrator, and UM educator Denman Fink, with additional materials provided by Special Collections. Now on display through summer 2017 on the eighth floor of the Otto G. Richter Library.

Denman Fink (1880-1956) is often remembered as the artist and illustrator who left an important legacy through the designs he created for George Merrick’s real estate projects in Coral Gables during the 1920s. But he was also a highly regarded educator of art and architecture at the University of Miami, from the founding of the University in 1926 until his retirement in 1952. Since the University of Miami was always an integral part of Merrick’s planned community, Fink, a board member of the consulting architects of Coral Gables, was involved with the University from its inception.

Image courtesy of University Archives, University of Miami Libraries.

The University Archives holds original materials by Denman Fink in the University of Miami Campus Architecture Collection. Fink created the iconic promotional poster entitled Keep the World Coming to Florida, Build the University of Miami, and the collection also includes artistic renderings and preliminary studies for the campus, many never realized, as well as lesser-known architectural drawings of the Solomon G. Merrick Building, campus dormitories, studio apartments, a research lab, and a stadium. A portrait of President Bowman Foster Ashe painted by Fink, and the master’s thesis “Denman Fink: Dream Coordinator to George Merrick and the Development of Coral Gables, Florida,” represent other important items that are available for research.

These materials complement the The Life and Art of Denman Fink, an exhibition currently on view at the Coral Gables Museum. University Archives partnered with the museum and provided a number of digitized items for their exhibit, including the photograph to the right of President Ashe viewing his portrait, which was painted by Denman Fink in 1952.





Join Us for “Book Collecting 101: How to Start Your Own Fabulous Special Collection”

 

Book Collecting 101: How to Start Your Own Fabulous Special Collection

Thursday, March 2
7 – 9 p.m.

Discussion starts at 7:30 p.m.

Lowe Art Museum 
1301 Stanford Drive | Coral Gables, FL 33146

The urge to collect things—books, maps, paintings, swizzle sticks, match boxes—has been with us through the ages and cuts across many boundaries.

Join Cristina Favretto, head of Special Collections at the University of Miami Libraries, who has worked with collections and collectors for almost thirty years, for an illuminating discussion on the joys of creating a great, fun, and inspiring book collection (without necessarily spending a lot of money!).

This event is part of the ongoing ID Project at the Lowe Art Museum. Learn more about the project »

Cost: $12.50 admission to Lowe After Hours; complimentary for Lowe members

Parking is available at the Pavia Garage near Stanford Drive. Learn more about parking »





Curate Your Own Identity at the ID Project

 

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This pop-up exhibition is a platform for exploring identity through art and the written word.

The ID Project opened on October 27 at the Lowe Art Museum as a pop-up exhibition and experimental space that encourages visitors to reflect on and explore notions of identity. The exhibition encompasses a display of identity-centric artists’ books and zines for purchase and browsing, with a focus on questions such as: Who am I? Who are you? Who are we?

The ID Project is the result of a unique partnership with the Lowe, co-curated and co-created by Jill Deupi, Beaux Arts Director and Chief Curator of the Lowe; Cristina Favretto, Head of Special Collections at University of Miami Libraries; and Amanda Keeley, Founder of EXILE Books, and occupies the space of the Lowe’s former Store.

During the opening on October 27, guests engaged in a variety of activities to “curate their identities,” including:
• Making and decorating a 3D paper mask with different materials
• Using mirrors to study their reflection and draw their self-portrait
• Creating and sharing a 10-line bio-poem with friends, other guests, or….just for them
• Using a special app to develop their own personal musical beat on an iPad
• Placing color beads in vessels to express reactions to six selected artworks in the Lowe
Writing Class Radio, who was on hand to facilitate writing true stories about personal identity

On view through April 2017, The ID Project will be accompanied by a series of “identity salons” that invite visitors to tackle this fundamental concept from a wide range of angles, including gender, sex, culture, race, age, and socio-economic status. In addition, special programs will address the theme of identity, and complement the Lowe’s dynamic exhibitions currently on view, all of which speak to the notion of identity and Walt Whitman’s truism: “We contain multitudes.” The schedule of salons and programs will be announced.

“Identity shapes our lives, both independent and collective,” says Jill Deupi, Beaux Arts Director and Chief Curator of the Lowe. The ID Project provides an exciting platform for expressing ideas about how we define ourselves and how we see others, and serves as a flexible viewing and making space for education, enrichment, and enjoyment,” she adds.

The ID Project is sponsored in part by the Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, and the State of Florida.



“Pink Powder” Exhibition Now On View

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Silueta Works in Iowa, Ana Mendieta, 1976, on view at Richter Library. The photograph is part of Mendieta’s series depicting her silhouettes created from the earth over time.

September 20 – November 1, 2016
Otto G. Richter Library, 2nd floor

Featuring works by Tracey Emin, Naomi Fisher, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Ana Mendieta, and Susanne Winterling

Pink Powder, an exhibition of renowned works owned by the de la Cruz Collection is now on view at Richter Library. The exhibition brings together a group of artists whose work addresses the female form and identity.

Imagery varying from the quiet and ponderous, to the raw and rebellious, subvert the traditional role of the female muse within the canons of art history, literature, and popular culture.

From the “earth-body” work of Cuban-American artist, Ana Mendieta, to the drawings of female bodies as plants by Miami artist, Naomi Fisher; and from the confessional work of British artists, Tracey Emin and Sam Taylor-Johnson, to the autobiographical work of Berlin-based artist, Susanne Winterling; the artists in this exhibition address the female body with an unapologetic intensity and encourage a conversation on the healing power of the visual arts.

This exhibition is organized by the de la Cruz Collection in collaboration with the the Libraries and Miami Institute for the Americas with contributions by the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Lowe Art Museum in the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Frost School of Music on the occasion of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, October 2016.

 



Student Co-Curated Exhibition Explores Orange Bowl Festival History

8-25-2016 1-57-13 PM

Design for a Busch Gardens Orange Bowl Parade entry, 1970. Orange Bowl Committee Archives, University of Miami Special Collections.

by Sarah Block, Library Communications

For many ’Cane fans, Miami Orange Bowl nostalgia comes with the territory of football season. But this year is special—marking ten years since the team kicked off their final season at the original home field. With the help of the archives, two UM undergraduate students have been gearing up for the anniversary.

Over the course of ten months, Andrew Wodrich, ’17, and Francesca Ciuffo, ’19, conducted research using the rarely seen records of the Orange Bowl Committee held by the University of Miami Special Collections. Their efforts have culminated in the first public display of the organization’s papers, titled Miami Celebrates: The Orange Bowl Festival, 1930s-1990s.

miamicelebrates

Miami Celebrates: The Orange Bowl Festival, 1930s-1990s marks the first public display of the Orange Bowl Committee Papers.

Now on view on the first floor of the Otto G. Richter Library, the exhibition features original photographs, letters, and memorabilia, among other materials, donated to the University in 2012, highlighting six decades of Orange Bowl Festival events and many memorable moments at the iconic stadium.

The students co-curated the exhibition under the mentorship of UM librarians as part of the new Library Research Scholars Program, which promotes student engagement with the University of Miami Libraries’ research collections and service programs.

Aerial view of the Miami Orange Bowl, 1964. From the University of Miami Historical Photograph Collection, University Archives.

Aerial view of the Miami Orange Bowl, 1964. From the University of Miami Historical Photograph Collection, University Archives.

“I was really interested in researching Coral Gables and Miami history, and that led me to the work of the Orange Bowl Committee,” explains Wodrich, a neuroscience and history major from Michigan. “Immediately I became fascinated by the story of people, so many decades ago, working together to create something out of nothing.”

Wodrich and Ciuffo’s discoveries actually date back to even before the founding of the Orange Bowl Festival (which continues today as the Capital One Orange Bowl). One featured poster advertises the precursor bowl known as the Festival of Palms, held on New Year’s Day, 1932. The Hurricanes faced Manhattan College at downtown Miami’s Moore Park, winning 7-0. “It was an idea to attract tourists for the holidays, which the city desperately needed, economically speaking,” Wodrich says.

That game, they explain, set the stage for the Orange Bowl—its annual match-ups as well as the surrounding festivities. Burdine Stadium, later named the Miami Orange Bowl (and today’s site of Marlins Park) opened in 1937, just five years following the Palm Festival. But the elaborate pageantry, flamboyant parades, and slough of events now iconic to the Orange Bowl brand spread out far beyond the stadium walls.

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Francesca Ciuffo, who co-curated the exhibition as a freshman, discusses her work at an April reception celebrating the inaugural class of Library Research Scholars.

The parade is a prominent exhibition highlight, with large-scale illustrations of original float designs over its walls showing off a substantial creative investment matched by a variety of corporate sponsorships, from Busch Gardens to Eastern Airlines, Barnett Bank, and Coppertone. “It was a major undertaking. Earnie Seiler, today considered the ‘father of the Orange Bowl,’ selected the participants and established the lineup,” Ciuffo explains.

“The festival just took over the city,” says Ciuffo, a public relations and broadcast journalism major from New York. “People from all over the country and world were suddenly coming in droves for the attractions. There were tennis tournaments at Flamingo and Salvadore Parks, a regatta that started at the Pelican Harbor Marina, and of course there was the parade, which was held on Biscayne Boulevard.”

wodrich

“There is a strong UM tie throughout the history of the Orange Bowl that we really wanted to come through,” says exhibition co-curator Andrew Wodrich, ’17.

The final parade, held in 2001, capped off a 66-year tradition that still shines in the legacy of Seiler, who as City of Miami’s director is remembered as a creative and technical driving force in all areas of the festival. “He was a local football coach who just through persistence got this thing off the ground,” Wodrich says. “Originally he was out there on the street just waving down cars to get people to fill the stands.”

The exhibition additionally highlights some of the original members of the Orange Bowl Committee, including UM trustees Oscar E. Dooly and Arthur A. Unger, which Wodrich points out as a meaningful connection. “There is a strong UM tie throughout the history of the Orange Bowl that we really wanted to come through.”

Miami Celebrates: The Orange Bowl Festival, 1930s-1990s is on view through December 2016. The exhibition is sponsored by the Lynda and Michael Gordon Exhibition Program.

Photos by Brittney Bomnin.



Replicating an Ancient Artifact: Exhibit Highlights 3D Printing in Action at the U

As part of the research for a current exhibit at the Lowe Art Museum, Kay Pacha: Reciprocity with the Natural World, curator Dr. Traci Ardren collaborated with Dr. William Pestle, a faculty member in the Department of Anthropology, and anthropology student Adam Sticca to gain insight on how ancient Andean people made and used the art that would help tell the story of their lives 2,000 years ago. By creating a 3D replica of one such piece, an ancient Peruvian whistling vessel, the researchers were able to carry out intensive study of the artifact’s qualities in ways that could not have been done with the fragile original.

kayPacha_547x547

UM researchers used the Digital Media Lab‘s 3D printer to replicate an ancient artifact from the collection of the Lowe Art Museum.

The 3D print, created in Richter Library’s Digital Media Lab through CT scan images they provided to the lab, is now on view on the first floor of Richter Library.

“From an archaeological perspective, 3D printing capabilities allow for more intensive study of an artifact free from any destructive processes which would damage the original piece,” says Adam Sticca, a freshman in the Department of Anthropology. “In this specific case, the printed replica allowed us to more closely examine the complex structure inside the hollow base. The process took a fair amount of trial and error in order to properly print the object as a hollow structure. This printed replica serves as a shining illustration of the capabilities and applications of 3D printing technology now offered at the library.”

Kay Pacha: Reciprocity with the Natural World is on view at the Lowe Art Museum through July 2, 2016. To learn more about 3D printing, including how to use it for your projects, stop by the Digital Media Lab and sign up for a 3D printing consultation.