On Display at Weeks: Banned Music and Musicians

Weeks Music Library has joined with Richter Library to commemorate Banned Books Week 2017. Weeks is hosting an exhibit of music and musicians that have been banned, boycotted, or challenged for a variety of reasons around the world and throughout the 20th century.

UM Libraries wants to celebrate Banned Books Week by highlighting not only books, but all kinds of creative works that have targeted in order to keep their messages from being heard.

Our exhibit will run through the end of the semester.

For more information on Banned Books Week, visit http://library.miami.edu/blog/2017/09/25/banned-books-week-2017/.



Camner Family Donates Rare Musical Treasures

University of Miami Trustee Alfred Camner, his wife, Anne Camner, and their four children, all of whom are UM alumni, have made a donation to the University of rare and valuable scores composed by musical giants—from Beethoven to Gershwin—that were printed and bound during the composers’ lives.

Alfred (J.D. ’69) and Anne (J.D. ’72), along with children Danielle Camner Lindholm (J.D. ’95), Errin Camner (L.L.M. ’99), Lauren Camner Winter (M.B.A. ’98), and Andrew Camner (B.A. ’09), donated several hundred scores, collectively forming the Camner Family Music Collection, to the Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library and Technology Center at the Frost School of Music, where it will be available to UM students, researchers, and the public.

“It is our family’s desire that this collection of first and early printed music editions form the true start to creating an extraordinary musicological resource, unmatched by modern editions,” said Alfred Camner, who, with his wife, also endowed UM’s Camner Center for Academic Resources.

The collection features historical works spanning three centuries and with origins in many parts of the world. Collection materials include rare lithography-printed and leather-bound editions of Christoph Willibald Gluck’s Alceste (1767), Georges Bizet’s Carmen (1875), and Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring (1913), among many others published between the 18th and 20th centuries.

Shelton Berg, dean of the Frost School, calls the gift a “transformative” resource for members of the Frost School and beyond. “When we look at a recently published score of a musical work from 100 years ago or more, we are seeing the music as something ‘from the past,’” Berg says. “Conversely, when a student performer or researcher examines an original edition score, with the marginal notations, the music is suddenly ‘in the present.’ They are experiencing it in the time of its creation. It’s hard to describe the exhilaration that produces.”

The Camner Collection arrives as the University is preparing to carry out new initiatives supporting educational innovation and encouraging new pedagogical approaches in the classroom. Frank Cooper, research professor emeritus at the Frost School, says this timing is important. “In an age where electronic media have taken over, there are no research materials to compare to original objects, in this case, printed scores from the times of the composers themselves. How invaluable for researchers today and for many generations to come.”

In details such as marginal notations, Camner says, the collection reveals how scores were studied and used in practice, in concerts, and in opera houses through time. Additionally, notes may point to how the music has evolved. “There is no substitute for the feeling a scholar or music student gets from handling a score that might have been used by Beethoven or Verdi or Puccini or Stravinsky, scores published in their lifetimes, edited by them, and often later corrected or changed,” Camner says. “These first and early editions are the closest we get to a sense of the time and place and world of the composer, a time when the composers often depended on the sales of these scores for their livelihoods.”

Nancy Zavac, who heads the Weeks Music Library, says that the Camner Collection brings a new level of research prestige to the library, which houses a wide range of musicology resources, including modern books, journals, and recordings, as well as unique and distinctive materials. “All music librarians are eager to have treasures in their collections. The Camner Collection is such a thing. It is exciting for me and my staff to care for, and greatly enhances our holdings.”

Dean of Libraries Charles Eckman expressed deep gratitude to the Camner Family for donating this important collection. “Miami is notable for the presence of several individual collectors of rare and unique cultural and bibliographic treasures,” he said. “The Camner Family is to be commended for their appreciation of the scholarly and teaching value of this private collection, and we celebrate their generosity of spirit in enabling the exposure and application this collection will have at the University of Miami for current and future generations of researchers and students.”



Now on View at Weeks Music Library: Video Game Music

Mario

Mario, from the Super Mario Bros. series

Over the last few decades, video games have blossomed from simple entertainment to a vibrant art form and one of the world’s fastest-growing industries. As appreciation for the medium has grown, the music of video games has become particularly celebrated. It is thus with great pride that Weeks Music Library has begun curating a collection of video game soundtracks and scores to promote and support the study of this music within the Frost School of Music and across the University of Miami. Our growing collection highlights the music of games released from the 1980s to today, and heavily features the work of American and Japanese composers. A selection of these materials is currently on display at Weeks Music Library. You can also browse our collection in the catalog.



Now On View at Weeks Library: Frank Sinatra Centennial Exhibit

Frank Sinatra cropped

The Weeks Music Library presents a selection of materials from its collections that highlight the profound, multifaceted cultural influence of the artist—perhaps best reflected in the assortment of nicknames including “Chairman of the Board,” “The Voice,” “Ol’ Blue Eyes,” and others by which he is still remembered. This exhibition spans his many memorable musical hits as well as his acting achievements, including his involvement in the Rat Pack, and other influential endeavors throughout his life.

Born December 12, 1915, Francis Albert Sinatra began his career performing as a big band crooner before finding fame as a popular singer and actor, culminating in his 1953 Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for From Here to Eternity.

Though his popularity dwindled somewhat in later years, he stepped back into the spotlight with his 1980 cover of “(Theme from) New York, New York.” After a brief “retirement” in 1971, Sinatra continued performing and touring until his death in 1998.

Infamous for his membership in the “Rat Pack,” his alleged Mafia connections, and his ties to such political notables as John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan, Sinatra remains a beloved and fascinating figure of American popular music and culture.



Tasty Tunes – Selections from the Musical Theater Archive

singCoffee… candy… picnics… pie… some things are so good you could just sing about them! And, in fact, countless songs have been written about food and drink over the years. To celebrate all things gastronomic, the Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library presents a selection of songs from the Larry Taylor-Billy Matthews Musical Theater Archive. From “Tea for Two” to “Let ’em Eat Cake,” the exhibit highlights the importance of food and drink to American culture.

The exhibit will run through the summer. Come and sample the melodic morsels we have to offer!



Celebrating Irving Berlin

IrvingBerlinLegendary composer and lyricist Irving Berlin hit it big in 1911 with “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” before going on to compose over 1,000 songs and several hit musicals such as Annie Get Your Gun. His tunes are an important part of the Great American Songbook.

To honor this great American songwriter on the 25th anniversary of his death, the Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library is pleased to present a selection of sheet music from the Larry Taylor-Billy Matthews Musical Theater Archive, accompanied by some of Berlin’s most popular musical films. The exhibit will run through the end of the semester.



75th Anniversary of The Wizard of Oz

OzSmallThe Wizard of Oz premiered August 25, 1939. Based on the 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, the film follows Dorothy Gale from her home in Kansas to the Technicolor Land of Oz. With her faithful dog, Toto, Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Cowardly Lion “follow the yellow brick road” to the Emerald City and beyond.

Noted for its mastery of set design, effects, music, and narrative, The Wizard of Oz has become a cherished classic in the American film canon.

In celebration of the 75th anniversary of this treasured film classic, the Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library is pleased to present a selection of materials from the University of Miami Libraries. These include books, scores, vinyl records, CDs, DVDs, and promotional materials. Come take a trip “over the rainbow” to the Land of Oz!



Liber Magistri: 12th century “encyclopedia of Western Europe”

The Liber magistri “has been described as one of the first encyclopedias of Western Europe in the 12th century.” Aside from a complete repertory of Gregorian chant—including the entire repertory of chants for the celebration of the mass and the divine office—the codex contains writings about the history and theory of music, theater, miniature production, medicine, agriculture, and other sciences.

The facsimile edition is reproduced in full color and bound in leather with brass closures. Presented to Professor Frank Cooper on the occasion of his retirement by University Librarian Bill Walker, this codex is a marvelous addition to the Frank Cooper Music Facsimile Collection.

 



Celebrating Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring!

On May 29, 1913, Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring premiered in Paris. It debuted to a riot between audience members thrilled by the innovative work and those who jeered at the bizarre choreography and discordant music. Despite its less-than-auspicious beginnings, the Rite is now considered one of the most important works of the 20th century.

The Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library is pleased to present an exhibit aboutThe Rite of Spring, which celebrated its centennial just last year. A facsimile edition of the autograph manuscript and images of an original costume design worn by one of the dancers are joined by quotes from modern day scholars and contemporary witnesses to the premiere of the ballet.

This exhibit will run through the Spring semester.