2018–2019 Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowship Awards

Featured

The University of Miami Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) welcomed eleven new Goizueta Graduate Fellows beginning in June. Hailing from institutions across the United States, the 2018–2019 cohort of fellows is comprised of historians, literary specialists, and musicology scholars.

2018–2019 is the ninth year of the CHC’s graduate fellowships program. In 2015 the Goizueta Foundation made a $1 million gift to endow graduate fellowships at the Cuban Heritage Collection.

The Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowship Program provides assistance to doctoral students in the U.S. who wish to use the research resources available in the Cuban Heritage Collection at the University of Miami Libraries. The goal of the program is to engage emerging scholars with the materials available in the CHC and thus contribute to the larger body of scholarship in Cuban, Latin@, hemispheric, and international studies.

For more information about fellowship opportunities at the Cuban Heritage Collection or to learn about past fellows, click here.

Graduate Research Fellows

Laura Almeida
Pennsylvania State University (Art History)
Resisting Memory: Anti-Imperialist Tactics of Forgetting in Latin American Contemporary Art

Ingrid Brioso Rieumont
Princeton University (Spanish and Portuguese)
On the Other Side of the End—Imagining Cuba’s and Brazil’s Afterwards

Jorge Felipe González
Michigan State University (History)
Foundation and Growth of the Cuban Slave Trade, 1790-1840

Melissa Hampton
University of Minnesota (History)
The Gendered Politics of Refugee Resettlement in the Cuban Mariel Migration of 1980

Brianna Nofil
Columbia University (History)
Detention Power: Jails, Camps, and the Construction of Immigrant Incarceration

Carina Schorske
Columbia University (English & Comparative Literature)
Scattered Bodies, Fugitive Forms: American Women Artists in the Caribbean

Alberto Sosa Cabañas
Florida International University (Modern Languages)
Racism, Celebration, and Otherness: Depictions of Blackness in the Cuban Cultural Discourse

 

Graduate Pre-Prospectus Fellows  

Charles Grand
University of Texas at Arlington (History)
Combined and Uneven Investment: U.S. Capital and the Economic Development of Cuba

Cary Peñate
University of Texas at Austin (Musicology)
Rum, Tobacco, Dance, and Music: The Mulata as Signifier in Twentieth-Century Cuban Film

Justo Planas Cabreja
City University of New York (Latin American, Iberian, & Latino Cultures)
Modernist Literature and Latin American Medicine: Between Strange Forces and Sick People (The Case of Cuba)

Roseli Rojo Posada
Rutgers University (Spanish)
Resistances in the Cuban Lettered City: Excluded Group’s Interaction With the Colonial City



Caribbean Fragments | A Library-Wide Exhibit Complements a Special Report on the University’s Close Relationship With Its Island Neighbors

Since its founding more than 90 years ago, the University of Miami has forged deep connections with the Caribbean. Faculty, students, and alumni travel throughout the islands, learning from diverse populations, providing assistance to underserved communities, and strengthening bonds. Cuba and the Caribbean, a special report recently produced by UM News in collaboration with academic units across the University including the Libraries, highlights the U’s varied activities in the Caribbean in areas such as environmental and anthropological research, healthcare, arts and culture, policy, and business.

Complementing the publication of Cuba and the Caribbean, a major exhibition has transformed the second floor of the Otto G. Richter Library and the Cuban Heritage Collection’s Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion. Caribbean Fragments comprises a selection of historical documents, artifacts, manuscripts, and rare books from UML’s Cuban Heritage Collection, Special Collections, University Archives, and the Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library, and offers a point of departure for reflection on the research and discovery that spawn new hemispheric insights.

Caribbean Fragments was co-curated by Beatrice Skokan, curator for Caribbean Collections and interim Esperanza Bravo de Varona Chair of the CHC, and Dr. Martin Tsang, CHC librarian and curator for Latin American Collections.

Seascapes and Mindscapes

Visiting artist Leandro Soto, whose work is represented among the CHC’s holdings, has reimagined the exhibition space as a seascape—a fluid, ever-changing ocean that permeates not only the archipelago’s geography, but the imagination of its inhabitants. Inviting viewers to navigate their own experiences and emotions as they explore the objects on view, the immersive environment evokes the circulating currents of spirituality that permeate the region, the profound influence of maritime travel and migration on its evolution, and the ebbs and flows of its eternal complexities.

To view the special University report on Cuba and the Caribbean, visit cuba.miami.edu.





CHC Research Colloquia 2017-2018: Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellows Speak on their Research

The Cuban Heritage Collection’s 2017-2018 Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowship Research Colloquia kicks off in August with several talks by researchers who will be describing their works in progress.

​Colloquia are scheduled for 3 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Held at the Elena Díaz-Versón Amos Conference Room in the Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion on second floor of the Otto G. Richter Library, these events are free and open to the public.

  • Tuesday, August 1
  • John Ermer, Florida International University (History)
    The Lebanese Mahjar in Cuba
  • Asiel Sepulveda, Southern Methodist University (Art History)
    City Impressions: Frédéric Mialhe and the Making of Nineteenth-Century Havana
  • Thursday, August 3
  • Lilianne Lugo Herrera, University of Miami (Modern Languages and Literatures)
    Transnational Black Bodies: Caribbean Perspectives on the Theater of the Cuban Diaspora
  • Thursday, August 10
  • Rodrigo Del Rio, Harvard University (Romance Languages and Literatures)
    Cuban Urban Imaginaries: Writing the City on the Verge of Revolution
  • Tuesday, August 15
  • Alberto Sosa Cabanas, Florida International University (Modern Languages)
    Racism, Celebration and Otherness: Depictions of Blackness in the Cuban Cultural Discourse (1790-1959)
  • Tuesday, August 22
  • Catherine Mas, Yale University (History, Program in the History of Science and Medicine)
    The Culture Brokers: Medicine, Anthropology, and Transcultural Miami, 1960-1990
  • Wednesday, October 11
  • Corinna Moebius, Florida International University (Global and Sociocultural Studies)
    Transnational Racial Politics of Public Memory and Public Space in Little Havana’s Heritage District
  • Friday, December 15
  • Rosanne Sia, University of Southern California (American Studies and Ethnicity)
    Performing Fantasy in Motion: The Hemispheric Circulation of Women Performers, 1940-1960
  • William Kelly, Rutgers University (History)
    Revolución es [Re]construir: Housing Policy and Everyday Life in the Cuban Revolution, 1959-1989

Learn more about the Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowships »



FIU, UM Join Statewide Effort to Raise Florida Presence in National Online Library

Sunshine State Digital Network Helps Organizations Around State Enlarge Access to their Digitized Collections

Souvenir of Miami, Miami Beach, Florida

Souvenir of Miami, Miami Beach, Florida from the University of Miami Special Collections.

Cultural, historical, and educational institutions throughout South and Central Florida can now share their digitized holdings with people across the United States and around the world with guidance from librarians and digital strategists at Florida International University (FIU) and the University of Miami (UM).

The two universities have partnered with Florida State University (FSU) in Tallahassee, FL, to create the Sunshine State Digital Network (SSDN), which serves as the state’s administrative and infrastructure portal to the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA).

The Boston-based DPLA is a public, open-source platform that connects users to digitized art works, artifacts, archival documents, and other materials from organizations ranging from modest community historical societies to massive cultural institutions. Assets contributed by Florida organizations to DPLA are displayed in search results alongside those from many other collections, fostering learning, research, tourism, business, and other endeavors.

The shared network roles of FIU and UM will be to help South and Central Florida organizations make sure that the metadata—information such as title, description, and copyright status—of each item in their collections conforms to DPLA standards. FIU and UM then transmit the optimized digital files to the SSDN hub at FSU, which gathers and prepares the files for quarterly “harvesting,” or uploading, by the DPLA. FIU and UM also collaborate with the SSDN on efforts to facilitate and expand the representation of Florida institutions in the rapidly growing national research resource.

“DPLA and SSDN offer a tremendous opportunity to share the depth and richness of our state’s digital collections,” said Anne Prestamo, Dean of Libraries at FIU. “We look forward to advising and assisting libraries, museums, and archives throughout South and Central Florida to fully leverage that potential.”

“Through SSDN, we are making it possible for archives, libraries, museums, and other collections across the state to publish their unique holdings on a global platform,” said Charles Eckman, Dean of University of Miami Libraries and University Librarian. “It’s all about fostering discovery and innovation through enhanced access, which is central to our mission and vision.”

By presenting search results aggregated from diverse sources, DPLA also creates new options and experiences for site visitors. “When people see items from Florida troves intermingled with those from other contributors, they are able to make novel connections that would have been extremely difficult to make otherwise,” said Sarah Shreeves, associate dean of digital strategies at UM Libraries.

“The community at large benefits from this increased ability to engage with cultural and historical content across multiple institutions,” noted Jamie Rogers, director of FIU’s Digital Collection Center.

Since FIU and UM have already uploaded a significant portion of their own digital collections to DPLA, the two universities are now prioritizing efforts to grow the number of Florida organizations participating in the initiative. A November series of introductory SSDN workshops attracted representatives from more than 30 public libraries, museums, academic libraries, library cooperatives, and other cultural heritage institutions.

Greater Miami: Guide Book and History to The Magic City

Greater Miami: Guide Book and History to The Magic City from the University of Miami Special Collections.

In addition to outreach and orientation, metadata experts at FIU Libraries and UM Libraries provide interested organizations with hands-on assistance as needed. Initial development of the universities’ SSDN planning, training, and metadata evaluation procedures was supported by a grant from the Knight Foundation.

SSDN goals for 2018 include bringing the State Library and Archives of Florida into the DPLA fold while mentoring the many smaller organizations, both public and private, that seek to share their digital holdings on DPLA.

DPLA is completely open to public and can be visited at dp.la. Items in its collections can be located via a standard search query, maps, timelines, or in special exhibitions, as well as through an array of independently developed extensions that allow highly customized searches.

To learn more about the SSDN, visit sunshinestatedigitalnetwork.org or explore the collections on the dp.la site.



Handle with Care | Preservation Strategies for Pan Am’s Digital Archive

Conservator Duvy Argandoña prepares a document in the Conservation Lab on the first floor of the Otto G. Richter Library.

By Cory Czajkowski

Repair and conserve: a phrase that drives a vast and complex component of University of Miami Libraries’ (UML) mission. Primary source materials and books are handled over years, decades, and even centuries; room conditions fluctuate, humidity falls and rises, and critters occasionally find their way to them for a snack. For the specialists that manage UML’s Preservation Strategies Department, “repair and conserve” holds a significance akin to a “search and rescue” operation—only rather than a search for people, it’s about the search for and provision of aid to materials that are in distress or imminent danger. As items become damaged and too fragile to handle, they require treatment and special care in order to ensure they can remain accessible by students and researchers in the future.

The grant from the National Historic Publications and Records Commission has allowed UML to sustain such specialized preservation efforts as the digitization of materials from the Pan American World Airways, Inc. Records collection continues. This ongoing project is now at a stage where a second group of images from the renowned aviation collection are in the process of being made accessible by keyword search. These brochures, timetables, directories, and other items require special treatment prior to any scans or photographs to ensure that the text in them can be recognized, or that they can even be handled for image capturing purposes.

Argandoña uses the hot spatula and tweezers to repair small tears in a Pan Am brochure.

Duvy Argandoña is the conservator at the Otto G. Richter Library. She spends a good portion of her workdays in the Conservation Lab repairing Pan Am materials before they can be scanned. The Lab, a brightly-lit, state-of-the-art equipped facility, is an infirmary for the collection’s torn or creased materials, where Argandoña uses specialized machines and tools to reconcile any damage that might interfere with digitization.

“The meticulous work done by Duvy is so important to the process, because it’s essentially our means of loss control—vetting and repairing the materials in a way that ensures we are able to capture the best scans possible,” says Gabriella Williams, who works closely with Argandoña and is managing this digitization project. Williams prepares and triages the materials before they are sent to the Lab. She flags each box, folder-by-folder, and creates a detailed, object-level spreadsheet of the items that require attention.

The humidification dome releases a mist of deionized water to relax a map’s paper fibers.

Argandoña then uses both basic and more complex techniques, depending on the level of damage, to repair the selected materials. “For mending small tears in brochures and timetables, I use the hot spatula tool and heat-set tissue paper,” says Argandoña. She first cuts the tissue paper into five millimeter strips and then uses tweezers to line up the strips with the seams of the torn documents. Carefully holding the tissue paper in place with tweezers, she applies soft pressure with the hot spatula until the paper adheres.

If a large map or fold-out is wrinkled or bent, Argandoña places it in a humidification dome for up to 15 minutes before any further repairs are made. “The dome uses a deionized water vapor mist to help the paper fibers relax, then the item is arranged between blotter paper sheets in the oversized book press for 24 hours, or until all the creases are gone,” says Argandoña.

Martha Horan, head of Preservation Strategies.

On October 17, UML welcomed new Head of Preservation Strategies Martha Horan, who is enthusiastic about working with the Pan Am materials under the NHPRC grant.

“Too often one does not consider the highly skilled, artisan-like techniques that go on behind-the-scenes in a library to stabilize and treat materials as part of preservation and digitization,” says Horan. “It’s an impressive operation here, with an even more impressive team behind it. It’s an exciting time to be a part of the Libraries.”

Digital images of these materials from the Pan American World Airways, Inc. Records—which date from the company’s inception in 1927 until it ceased operations in 1991—are now available to the public for browsing and research purposes on the University of Miami Libraries’ Digital Collections web site.

Photos by Brittney Bomnin



Library Renovation Projects

Designing a Better Library for U: Renovation & Renewal at Richter

Building stronger connections with students, faculty, and our neighboring communities is essential to our ongoing mission at the University of Miami Libraries. Over the course of the past year, fostering new and deepened partnerships aimed at improving library spaces and programs has paved the way toward new and exciting projects. This page will serve to keep our community updated on the progress of two ongoing renovations on the first floor of the Otto G. Richter Library: the Kislak Center at the University of Miami and the UM Libraries Learning CommonsLearn more.





2017-2018 Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowship Awards

Featured

The University of Miami Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) will welcome eleven new Goizueta Graduate Fellows beginning in July. Hailing from institutions across the United States, the 2017-2018 cohort of fellows is comprised of historians, literary specialists, and ethnicity scholars.

2017-2018 is the eighth year of the CHC’s graduate fellowships program. In 2015 the Goizueta Foundation made a $1 million gift to endow graduate fellowships at the Cuban Heritage Collection.

The Goizueta Foundation Graduate Fellowship Program provides assistance to doctoral students in the U.S. who wish to use the research resources available in the Cuban Heritage Collection at the University of Miami Libraries. The goal of the program is to engage emerging scholars with the materials available in the CHC and thus contribute to the larger body of scholarship in Cuban, Latin@, hemispheric, and international studies.

For more information about fellowship opportunities at the Cuban Heritage Collection or to learn about past fellows, click here.

Graduate Research Fellows

Elizabeth Cerejido
University of Florida (Art and Art History)
Cuban (American) Art: Beyond Nation and Diaspora

William Kelly
Rutgers University (History)
Revolución es [Re]construir: Housing Policy and Everyday Life in the Cuban Revolution, 1959-1989

Sara Kozameh
New York University (History)
Harvest of Revolution: Cuban Agrarian Reform and the Politics of Consent, 1958-1970

Catherine Mas
Yale University (History, Program in the History of Science and Medicine)
The Culture Brokers: Medicine, Anthropology, and Transcultural Miami, 1960-1990

Corinna Moebius
Florida International University (Global and Sociocultural Studies)
Transnational Racial Politics of Public Memory and Public Space in Little Havana’s Heritage District

Rosanne Sia
University of Southern California (American Studies and Ethnicity)
Performing Fantasy in Motion: The Hemispheric Circulation of Women Performers, 1940-1960

 

Graduate Pre-Prospectus Fellows

John Ermer
Florida International University (History)
The Lebanese Mahjar in Cuba

Lilianne Lugo Herrera
University of Miami (Modern Languages and Literatures)
Transnational Black Bodies: Caribbean Perspectives on the Theater of the Cuban Diaspora

Rodrigo del Rio
Harvard University (Romance Languages and Literatures)
Cuban Urban Imaginaries: Writing the City on the Verge of Revolution

Asiel Sepulveda
Southern Methodist University (Art History)
City Impressions: Frédéric Mialhe and the Making of Nineteenth-Century Havana

Alberto Sosa Cabanas
Florida International University (Modern Languages)
Racism, Celebration and Otherness: Depictions of Blackness in the Cuban Cultural Discourse (1790- 1959)



Now On View at Richter Library | Art + Structure: The Impact and Legacy of Denman Fink

This University Archives exhibit highlights original materials that document the life and legacy of artist, illustrator, and UM educator Denman Fink, with additional materials provided by Special Collections. Now on display through summer 2017 on the eighth floor of the Otto G. Richter Library.

Denman Fink (1880-1956) is often remembered as the artist and illustrator who left an important legacy through the designs he created for George Merrick’s real estate projects in Coral Gables during the 1920s. But he was also a highly regarded educator of art and architecture at the University of Miami, from the founding of the University in 1926 until his retirement in 1952. Since the University of Miami was always an integral part of Merrick’s planned community, Fink, a board member of the consulting architects of Coral Gables, was involved with the University from its inception.

Image courtesy of University Archives, University of Miami Libraries.

The University Archives holds original materials by Denman Fink in the University of Miami Campus Architecture Collection. Fink created the iconic promotional poster entitled Keep the World Coming to Florida, Build the University of Miami, and the collection also includes artistic renderings and preliminary studies for the campus, many never realized, as well as lesser-known architectural drawings of the Solomon G. Merrick Building, campus dormitories, studio apartments, a research lab, and a stadium. A portrait of President Bowman Foster Ashe painted by Fink, and the master’s thesis “Denman Fink: Dream Coordinator to George Merrick and the Development of Coral Gables, Florida,” represent other important items that are available for research.

These materials complement The Life and Art of Denman Fink, an exhibition currently on view at the Coral Gables Museum. University Archives partnered with the museum and provided a number of digitized items for their exhibit, including the photograph to the right of President Ashe viewing his portrait, which was painted by Denman Fink in 1952.